Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "construction" ...

  • Tragedy on Verruckt

    On a Sunday afternoon in August, on a day in which local elected leaders and their families were welcomed to a Kansas City, Kan., water park for free, the 10-year-old son of a Kansas House representative lost his life on the world's tallest water slide. Questions about the construction and oversight of that ride are the basis for these stories.
  • Bird-dogging the Buffalo Billion

    Gov. Andrew Cuomo launched the "Buffalo Billion" program in 2012 with the intention of revitalizing the Western New York economy. Investigative Post's reporting documented the extraordinary lengths to which Cuomo administration has gone to withhold disclosure of how the $1 billion is being spent. Our reporting also revealed that lucrative development contracts were awarded to major donors to Cuomo's campaign committee and that SolarCity, the major beneficiary of the state's spending, is losing vast amounts of money and under federal investigation. Subsequent reporting detailed that minority hiring goals for the SolarCity project, involving the construction of a $750 million solar panel manufacturing plant, were lowered and that African Americans made up less than 6 percent of the workforce.
  • Off Track

    An investigation into the finances of the $6.6 billion Honolulu rail project, the largest public construction project in the history of Hawaii. This ongoing series examines where the money is going, whether local companies and workers are getting the jobs and whether it is bolstering the state's economy.
  • Sea Level Rise

    The Bay Area's current waterfront building frenzy includes at least $21 billion in housing and commercial construction in low-lying areas that climate scientists say could flood by the end of the century. In examining approval processes for new buildings on the edge of San Francisco Bay, our team found that some cities are greenlighting waterfront development without planning for the long term or fully accounting for the future costs of reconfiguring large projects to resist flooding.
  • The PCB Plague

    We discovered that a majority of public schools in Connecticut could be contaminated with toxic, cancer-causing PCBs, but no state or federal law requires schools to test for the carcinogenic chemical. Even though PCBs were banned in 1979, a loophole in federal regulations allows schools to avoid testing for PCBs, leaving the chemical in place where it emits gaseous toxins, and sending PCB particles into the air and ground during and after construction projects where it can remain for decades.
  • Blowing the Whistle on Oil Companies in Canada

    This investigation dives into why there was an uptick in whistleblower reports to Canada’s National Energy Board, and ended with the revelation that two former TransCanada employees had raised numerous safety allegations about Canada’s largest pipeline operator — the same company that wanted to build the controversial pipeline project
  • Politics in Cook County Schools

    In the April, 2015 Cook County elections, a number of local mayors, two state representatives and a township highway commissioner got actively involved in local school board elections. They paid for campaign mailers, palm cards and even robo-calls. When the Illinois State Board of Elections released campaign donation information for the second quarter of 2015, a web of cash and in-kind donations to local school board campaign committees was revealed. Three recurring donors showed up in the campaign contribution records for the politicians and school board committees. They are Del Galdo Law Group, Odelson & Sterk attorneys, and Franklin Park company Restore Construction.
  • The Man Behind the Closing Curtains

    A six-month Naples Daily News investigation exposed the dark past of theater creator James Duffy. An analysis of media reports, court records, company filings and interviews linked Duffy to 88 theaters in 26 states. Fifty-eight of the theaters either never opened or were open less than three years. A nationwide court case search found James Duffy or his companies have been sued at least 69 times and been ordered to pay at least $24.6 million in judgments since 1982. Duffy’s business convinced property owners to pay millions of dollars up-front for the construction or renovation of their theaters. His companies raked in ticket and concession sales from theaters that did open, but didn’t pay rent or other bills and abandoned theaters as lawsuits were filed. Contractors that should have been paid with the fronted renovation money went unpaid, as did investors, lenders, film distributors and even the lawyers who represented Duffy or his companies when they were sued. Numerous employees have also complained of not being paid.
  • Flushing Money

    The story details how California’s capital city, Sacramento, has delayed the mandated installation of water meters by more than a decade by adding on hundreds of millions of dollars of unnecessary, wasteful, often dangerous construction.
  • Embassy Construction

    For this story, Nancy Cordes and the producers working with her took a much closer look at the State Department’s new “Design Excellence” initiative for embassy construction and found it had some serious problems. The new embassy in London, nicknamed ‘The Cube’ that is currently under construction is $100 million over the original cost estimate. CBS found its glass was problematic to say the least. We broke the news that the thick glass for the building is acquired in Germany, shipped to Connecticut and then shipped back to London for construction. Critics told us they are concerned that the State Department is sacrificing safety and cost to make new embassies “pretty”. Our story looked at other embassies as well including a new building in Papua New Guinea where the cost has ballooned from $50 million to $211 million. In light of the terrorist attack in Benghazi, an independent review of embassy construction by former State Department officials found that delays in “design excellence” embassies meant that State Department employees were in harm’s way for longer periods of time.