Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "convicted murderers" ...

  • Shift in Supervision

    he Tennessee Department of Correction researched and created a new supervision policy for the state in 2014 that drastically reduced supervision for some and increased supervision for others. WJHL's investigation revealed that change left some criminals, even convicted murderers, with limited face-to-face contact with their probation and parole officers. Instead, some of those people now could report using an automated phone reporting system. A local district attorney and state representative said not only did they think the changes were a bad idea, they wished the state would have asked for their input or at the least, let them know the changes were on the way. TDOC maintained based on research and other state models this change would improve public safety. However, leaders from the state agency did acknowledge, when pressed, they could have done a better job of communicating the changes. In the days after the first story aired, as a direct result, TDOC's commissioner sent letters to the district attorney and state representative and told them he would be wanted to clear up their concerns directly.
  • The Hansen Files: Daycare Criminals

    Childcare advocates claim that inadequate state laws have made it easy for people with criminal convictions to get licensed to care for children—often with deadly consequences. Their evidence was often anecdotal--ripped from headlines of children dying in the care of someone whose past wasn't revealed until after the child had been harmed. When we looked into the problem we soon discovered that even when a criminal history disqualifies a potential candidate from childcare, states often grant licenses nonetheless. Parents not only aren’t informed of this, but some states actively conceal this information. And we found there are no existing databases that report caregivers’ criminal records or the results of background checks, so we set out to compile our own. The creation of that database then led us to an extensive, year-long data search in five states, from original arrest reports and police narratives to jail records, court records, state licensing files, exemption reports, inspection records and more. These records helped us unravel the many ways people with criminal records were able to get licensed. We then visited several centers and conducted an experiment in one state, submitting applications for childcare background checks for three women--all of them convicted murderers.
  • (Untitled)

    The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette investigates the consequences of Act 309, a 1983 law in Arkansas which allows state prisoners to be assigned to county jails to relieve prison overcrowding. Under Act 309 in Wayne, Ark. convicted murderers slept with members of the opposite sex outside the jail, drove around town at will in a sheriff's cruiser and performed work that helped the sheriff and his family personally. (May 12, 1996)
  • A tragic year

    1995 was a tragic year for Tucson and Pima county. A record number of people were killed. But the numbers do not tell of this tragedy. A Daily Star special section includes accounts from victims' families, convicted murderers and police officers.