Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "county government" ...

  • 134 Cases, $36 Million: Inside Sexual Misconduct At America's Biggest County Government

    A first-of-its-kind investigation into Los Angeles County revealed more than one hundred sexual misconduct cases that ended with settlements or judgments paid for with public funds.
  • The Clerk’s Files

    When Watchdog City began these stories as an outgrowth of beat reporting on county government, they had no idea it would lead to filing a lawsuit that successfully challenged high public records fees and produced a favorable ruling after a hard-fought trial in June 2014. With unlimited taxpayer funds at his disposal to spend on legal fees, the county’s elected auditor and accountant — the Clerk of Courts — has since appealed the circuit judge’s ruling in my favor. The case is now on its way to Florida’s Second District Court of Appeal.
  • Doctors Do Little?

    Months-long Better Government Association (BGA) investigation finds serious failings at the Cook County government health system, with doctors, nurses and other health-care workers failing to show up as scheduled, swipe in as required or work a full day – costing taxpayers big and potentially putting public safety at risk.
  • "Adams County: Exposing a Culture of Corruption"

    This KMGH-TV investigation that began with uncovering of millions of dollars in no-bid contracts in exchange for gifts and free construction and landscape work at the homes of top county officials, has resulted in the convictions of those officials and the owner and employees of a county subcontractor for cheating taxpayers out of millions of dollars. The investigation spanned five years and prompted a fundamental change in county government and reforms in policies, procedures, and the county charter through voter referendum to insure transparency and best practice. We believe this long term investigation represents the important role journalists play in representing the citizenry, holding government accountable through in-depth reporting, and prompting significant structural change for the long term benefit of the community.
  • Concealing County Corruption: Anatomy of a Cover-Up

    Wayne Dolcefino saves the best for last. In his final investigation for KTRK-TV, he and the 13 Undercover Unit demonstrated relentless persistence as they attempted to shake up a county government with an abysmal record of policing itself. This submission begins with four reports detailing shocking evidence of corruption inside the downtown precinct of Constable Jack Abercia. 13 Undercover spent several months doing painstaking surveillance -- catching the Constable’s deputies running his personal errands, working extra jobs on the clock and stockpiling never driven county patrol cars while lawmen were being laid off. 13 Undercover then managed to get a hidden camera inside the chief deputy’s office as he and two deputies talked openly about corruption inside the precinct. The language is often foul mouthed and always revealing. The FBI nabbed Aberica and two top commanders in a bribery sting weeks later. The veteran former constable is now awaiting trial. Eventually, 13 Undercover turned our cameras on county leaders to say “enough is enough.” Not only was action not forthcoming, it quickly became clear that many in positions of power wanted this all to go away without getting their hands dirty, without ending decades of a patronage system that made deputies feel required to give money to their boss’s campaigns and charities to keep their jobs. That was not an option. This investigation demanded accountability and we held leaders to the promises they made to the public. In late summer, 13 Undercover scored a major public records victory that revealed what one commentator dubbed "a cover-up of Nixonian proportions." The series culminated with the long awaited, and previously unimaginable, indictment of one of the county’s most popular elected officials – precinct 6 Constable Victor Trevino. New county directives now prohibit constables from soliciting money from their deputies and legislation is expected to filed in Austin to protect county employees from further shakedowns.
  • Bail Bondsmen: Working the Numbers

    A year-long investigation into the bail bond industry by the Dallas Morning News focused on the relationship between bail bondsmen, the judicial system, and the county government. The investigation uncovered corrupt practices, sweetheart deals, and dysfunctional oversight that cost taxpayers many millions of dollars.
  • Paying out millions, and playing favorites

    The series explored favoritism and ethical lapses in the way Sarasota County government awarded lucrative contracts to private vendors. We found that the county relied too much on "piggybacking," a purchasing shortcut that allowed low and middle-level employees to essentially award contracts to whoever they wanted without bids.
  • Dana Wright; Ken Ullery; Chris Henao

    The series shines light on the rampant poverty in the Kansas City area and the failure of the city and county government to address the problem.
  • WESD's Web of Deals

    A 16-month investigation of a regional education service agency showed that employees were charging the district for luxury rental cars, expensive hotels, Starbucks trips, and more as the district was struggling to stay afloat. It also found that numerous red flags raised over the past 10 years had been ignored.
  • Constables Under Fire

    “The series of stories examines the questionable employment practices and operations of several county constable officers”. Some of these practices include “aggressive and unregulated towing effort and questionable ties with a towing company, political campaign violations and the unprecedented expansion of constables’ police duties with minimal oversight”. These constables are now under civil and criminal investigations and have been accused of a number of things.