Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "cover up" ...

  • Silent No More

    The Hearst Television National Investigative Unit’s year-long investigation, ‘Silent No More,’ uncovered new allegations of child sexual abuse and decades-long cover-ups inside a religious organization in the United States. We also learned investigators from Attorneys General offices in at least three states have been looking into the Jehovah’s Witnesses church – and that the number has likely grown since our four-part series aired in August and September of 2019. Perhaps most importantly, the survivors who agreed to speak on-camera for this series told us they now have a new sense of empowerment; one launched a non-profit, a few testified before state legislatures, several obtained attorneys, and all told us of the confidence they gained after being silent for so long.
  • Orange County Register/Southern California News Group: Olympic sports sex abuse

    This Is the Orange County Register’s investigation into decades of sexual abuse within American Olympic sports, the culture that enabled that abuse and the lengths top officials and coaches have taken to cover up that abuse leaving unsuspecting young athletes still vulnerable to predatory coaches and officials.
  • CBS News: Investigating the Catholic Church

    CBS News investigation into the Catholic Church cover up of the systemic abuse of children by priests.
  • The Human Toll of Hanford's Dirty Secrets

    "The Human Toll of Hanford’s Dirty Secrets" exposed that in 2016 an unprecedented number of Hanford nuclear workers became ill after breathing toxic chemical vapors emanating from nuclear waste, while the federal government sat back and did little to remedy the crisis. We showed that instead of taking action to protect its workers, officials from the U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford’s operator, waged a cover up campaign, denied any problem existed, and even punished workers who insisted on better health protections.
  • Gov. Robert Bentley Scandal

    AL.com revealed first that Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley was involved in an inappropriate relationship with a top aide. The relationship was far more than a sex scandal. It raised questions about the spending of public money and the use of state airplanes, law enforcement and other resources to perpetuate or cover up the relationship.
  • The Downfall of Theranos

    The Wall Street Journal saved patients from harm by revealing fraud at the heart of one of Silicon Valley’s hottest companies. Were it not for the Journal’s reporting in 2016, tens of thousands of patients would have been put at risk and a company built on fraudulent foundations would still be a Silicon Valley darling. Theranos, a $9 billion laboratory startup, had promised to revolutionize blood testing by drawing just a few drops of blood with a finger prick. It wasn’t close. A team of Journal reporters, in a committed and extensive investigation, exposed how its technology didn’t work, how the company tried to cover up its failures and how patients’ lives were turned upside down and their health jeopardized.
  • Assault On Justice

    When you hear the charge “assaulting a police officer,” you might assume that an officer has been hurt or injured while serving the community. But in D.C., you might not be able to take so-called APOs at face value. WAMU 88.5 investigative reporter Patrick Madden, along with journalist Christina Davidson, teamed with the Center For Investigative Reporting's Reveal program and American University's Investigative Reporting Workshop to document and analyze nearly 2,000 cases with charges of assaulting a police officer. The results raise concerns about the use or overuse of the charge. Some defense attorneys see troubling indicators in the numbers, alleging that the law is being used as a tactic to cover up police abuse and civil rights violations. The statute “goes too far and criminalizes too much,” one expert says. http://wamu.org/projects/assault-on-justice/
  • State Police Secrets and Surveillance

    The Texas Department of Public Safety and politicians for years worked behind the scenes to create a system of surveillance, casting a net that included potential criminals and everyday innocent citizens. DPS, the state police, began covering up secrets and limiting media access when The Dallas Morning News Watchdog Desk began investigating. That led to the agency sending private memos to state legislators and staff in an attempt to stop or discredit The News', and other media outlets, story publications.
  • Opening the black box of Egypt's slush funds

    This exposé of massive corruption in Egypt at the hands of the country's military rulers and loyalists of the failed Mubarak regime launches a partnership between the Washington DC-based non-profit Angaza Foundation for Africa Reporting (TAFAR) and Africa Confidential, the longest-established English-language publication on Africa. Entitled "Opening the black box of Egypt's slush funds", the story details how Egyptian generals and senior government officials use a complex network of slush funds as their private piggy banks, siphoning off billions of dollars from the country to top-up salaries and maintain networks of political allegiances. It also describes how recent attempts to investigate these so-called special funds have led to cover-ups, including Egyptian police allegedly stealing records implicating them in the misuse of their own funds. This “deep dive” report exposing mishandled slush funds, financial cover-ups, and massive corruption in Egypt was edited by former veteran Reuters correspondent Bernd Debusman, and overseen by TAFAR’s President and Executive Director Bobby Block, a Wall Street Journal veteran. https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/egypt/2015-06-26/sisi-and-his-40-thieves
  • Sea Dragon Down

    The NBC News Investigative Unit, the Virginian-Pilot newspaper, tand the UC Berkeley Investigative Reporting Program revealed that the U.S. Navy’s Sea Dragon helicopters had killed more than 30 service members since they were launched in the 1980s, with the fatality rate rising in recent years – and that the Navy was trying to cover up the danger. The exclusive reporting of all three news organizations of the Navy’s cover-up helped spur the grounding of the entire fleet of more than 150 helicopters for most of 2015.