Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "cover up" ...

  • Raped in Iraq: The Halliburton Victims

    Jamie Leigh Jones and Tracy Barker both "said they were raped or sexually assaulted while working for Halliburton/KBR in Iraq." Parts of Jones' rape kit went missing after it was "turned over to Halliburton/KBR security guards." Meanwhile the "Justice Department declined prosecution even after State Department investigators recommended it, in the case of the "assault and attempted rape" of Barker by a State Department official.
  • District Lets Years of Misconduct Slide

    When Scottsdale Community College fired its music department chair "for purchasing expensive microphones for the college from his son, attempting to cover up the transaction and failing to show up for an electronic music class he was paid to teach," the East Valley Tribune received a tip that the teacher was only part of a bigger story. The investigation uncovered "fraud within the Maricopa County Community College District," including "a performing arts institute that enrolled its professors and clerical employees and their relatives in classes to keep itself operating." There were also major issues in the athletic department, with thousands of dollars missing. Situations such as these had been discovered previously, but the district had taken no action.
  • China Syndrome: The True Story of the 21st Centruy's First Great Epidemic

    "The real story of the emergence of the SARS virus, the Chinese government’s cover up of that outbreak and the scientists and public health officials who isolated the virus and told the world the truth."
  • Zipped Up!

    This story is part of Russell's ongoing investigation into how the Roman Catholic hierarchy covers up sex-abuse by priests. Specifically, this story focuses on how former San Francisco Archbishop William J. Levada co-opted district attorneys in three California counties to help keep decades of alleged sexual misconduct by priests secret.
  • Air Force Academy Sexual Assault Scandal.

    Studies have shown that the Air Force Academy has been a hostile place for most female cadets. This story is an in-depth investigation of the charges of sexual assault and the subsequent cover up of the charges. The Gazette revealed that in the past decade there were at least 142 sexual assaults that had been reported but few were actually investigated and hardly any cadets were reprimanded. As this investigation reveals, despite top officials being involved in the investigation proceedings, they did nothing to put an end to the problem.
  • Lords of Bakersfield

    From the questionnaire, "The Californian exposed the depths and extent to which the assistant district attorney of Kern County, Calif., went to manipulate and control the teenage son of one of his longest serving and most faithful investigators. The Californian also examined a series of murders dating back to the late 1970s, up to the present, that suggested a pattern of corruption at the higest levels of Kern County's government. Powerful mein were alleged to have used their positions to cover up their own, and others' duplicitous lives in which they secretly used teenage boys for sex. Cases involving the alleged conspirators, known as the Lords of Bakersfield, occasionally ended in murder."
  • Cook County Jail Beatings, Sheriff's Campaign Contributions

    "On a winter night in 1999, an elite squad of guards at the Cook County Jail in Chicago invaded a cellblock and, for hours, terrorized hundreds of inmates. With the unit's commander standing atop a table and barking orders, guards forced inmates to strip and proceeded to beat them. Later, the guards falsified records to cover up the assault and for years succeeded in derailing internal investigations into inmate complaints. The cover-up lasted for four years until Chicago Tribune staff reporters Steve Mills and Maurice Possley received a tip about the mass beating." The resulting story blew the lid off the beating scandal, and led to a number of public officials running for cover. Sheriff Michael Sheahan had come to his job promising solutions to the overcrowded jail and to end policies of brutality. Wondering why the Sheriff had allowed such a mass beating to take place and be covered up, the Tribune took a closer look at his campaign contributions -- and discovered the story went a lot deeper than they realized.
  • Stolen Souls

    This story details allegations that Wirt Norris, a former Olympic diving coach with glamorous friends, used his social and political connections to upper-crust Fort Worth to gain access to, and cover up his sexual abuse of, several generations of boys over a period of almost 50 years.
  • The Lords of Bakersfield

    "The Californian exposed the depths and extent to which the assistant district attorney of Kern County, Calif., went to manipulate and control the teenage son of one of his longest-serving and most faithful investigators. The Californian also examined a series of murders dating back to the late 1970s, up to the present, that suggested a pattern of corruption at the highest levels of Kern's county government. Powerful men were alleged to have used their positions to cover up their own, and others', duplicitous lives in which they secretly used teenage boys for sex. Cases involving the alleged conspirators, known as the Lords of Bakersfield, occasionally ended in murder."
  • Commutations and Pardons of Gov.Bill Janklow

    The Argus Leader discovered a slew of pardons and commutations that former Governor Bill Janklow had sealed from public view under a little-known state law. However, after appealing to the Attorney General, the records of Janklow's actions became public, and the scope of his pardons was brought to light. Apparently, Janklow commuted more prison sentences than any other governor in the nation during his last two terms.