Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "crime rate" ...

  • The Myth of the Criminal Immigrant

    Since taking office, President Trump has repeatedly claimed that immigrants bring a tremendous amount of crime into America. He's wrong, and the proof is in the data. This visual piece examines and demonstrates the relationship between immigration and crime in American cities over the past 40 years. Readers can see for themselves that increased immigration does not accompany higher violent crime rates. In fact, immigration is more frequently associated with reduced crime. This is important work: as of 2017, Gallup polls show that almost half of Americans agree that immigrants make crime worse. This research is crucial to debunking the dangerous myth that immigrants lead to crime.
  • The Texas Observer with The Investigative Fund: The Surge

    If Texas’s border counties have some of the lowest crime rates in the nation, why are they so heavily policed? As Melissa del Bosque shows, the State of Texas has gone all in on border security spending, devoting $2.6 billion to special-ops teams, armored gunboats, high-tech spy planes, and a surge of law enforcement personnel in the past several years — on top of a multibillion-dollar federal border security operation. For her piece for The Texas Observer, in partnership with The Investigative Fund, del Bosque interviewed residents and elected officials in these border counties, now among the most profiled and surveilled communities in America, who described how this two-fisted border security buildup has taken a toll on their civil liberties. In a separate analysis, Del Bosque joins with reporter G.W. Schulz to uncover how Texas's $15 million high-altitude spy planes have surveilled one border town at least 357 times and may have traveled multiple times into Mexican territory.
  • The Marshall Project: The Myth of the Criminal Immigrant

    Since taking office, President Trump has repeatedly claimed that immigrants bring a tremendous amount of crime into America. He's wrong, and the proof is in the data. This visual piece examines and demonstrates the relationship between immigration and crime in American cities over the past 40 years. Readers can see for themselves that increased immigration does not accompany higher violent crime rates. In fact, immigration is more frequently associated with reduced crime. This is important work: as of 2017, Gallup polls show that almost half of Americans agree that immigrants make crime worse. This research is crucial to debunking the dangerous myth that immigrants lead to crime.
  • Justice is not Blind

    Despite Canada’s dropping crime rate, incarceration rates of Indigenous people have been on the rise. Racial profiling and police brutality claims have increased throughout the Prairies but are often dismissed as isolated incidents by police departments. There is very little available data or research to verify whether or not the complaints are symptomatic of a larger systemic issue. Discourse Media and Maclean’s magazine collaborated on a months long investigation looking into whether the experience of Indigenous university students mirrored racial profiling claims in the Prairies, and to better understand student perceptions of police. Discourse Media designed, administered and analyzed a survey that showed that for those surveyed, Indigenous students have greater odds of being stopped by police than non-Indigenous students — and they believe their race is a factor.
  • Justice takes a Break

    Jails doors swung open in Washington State as thousands of offenders were transferred to alternative sentencing programs. This investigation showed that rising crime rates in Washington coincided with the declining inmate populations -- and the false promises behind some of those jail diversion programs https://vimeo.com/k5investigators/justice-takes-break
  • Border surge began as crime fell

    Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry and other top state officials sold a massive border state police and Texas National Guard buildup on tales of violent transnational crime spilling across the Rio Grande River. In a void of federal border security, only Texas could stem the tide, the narrative went. But after a months-long open records battle with the Texas Department of Public Safety, a finalist for the 2015 IRE Golden Padlock Award, and an unprecedented data analysis, the Houston Chronicle proved violent crime rates had been declining for years before the surge and were not significantly affected by the extra manpower.
  • ChiMag: Crime Stats

    Written by National Magazine Award finalists David Bernstein and Noah Isackson, this ambitious two-part investigative series, which took the better part of a year to report, exposed how the Chicago Police Department underreported homicides and improperly downgraded scores more serious felonies to lesser offenses in order to bolster the department's crime statistics and make the city appear safer.
  • Campus Insecurity

    An investigation by the Columbus Dispatch and Student Press Law Center exposed that many universities across the nation are under-reporting violent crimes that occur on campus, using secret judicial review boards to often hand out soft punishments for serious crimes and are violating the rights of both the victims and accused in a system that ignores due process. The deception begins with the name: Campus Security. Most campuses are anything but secure. And worse, administrators have cloaked their campus crime rates and poor response to them in secrecy — failing to take some complaints seriously, shunting what should be criminal cases into closed-door campus judicial hearings handled by untrained faculty and students, and refusing public records about the cases or stalling when asked for them.
  • "Fresno Cops Involved in Repeat Shootings Still on Duty"

    This investigative report by Ali Winston found that "27 Fresno police officers were involved in repeat shootings of civilians" from 2003 to 2009. Winston compared the data to the Oakland Police Department, a city that has a higher crime rate, during the same period of time and found that "only five officers were involved in repeat shootings." The Fresno Police Department's chief of internal affairs was "unaware of the number of officers involved in repeat shootings until contacted by Winston."
  • Failure of Justice

    The failed investigation of a police imposter who sexually assaulted at least 15 Apache teenagers serves as a window into the breakdown of law enforcement in Indian country. Native Americans suffer from disproportionate crime rates - especially sexual assaults - largely because of a dysfunctional criminal justice system. In this case, two men were falsely arrested and jailed; the real criminal got away and victims saw no justice. The government's own records, obtained through a federal lawsuit, demonstrate that the problem is systemic - a result of overlapping jurisdictions, mismanagement, lack of funding inadequate training and multiple other flaws.