Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "crime statistics" ...

  • The Numbers Game

    The Naked Truth: Numbers Game examines the inadequate and outdated collection of crime statistics and how this practice skews policing and public policy. Fusion’s Ryan Nerz uncovers the reality behind the numbers. They wrangled raw FBI data to develop key insights into policing in the U.S. Plus, they learned how gaming the numbers can lead to further inequality, discrimination, and in some cases, neglect. Stats may not be sexy, but this data affects how we live our lives every single day, especially if you are black in America. http://tv.fusion.net/story/373011/naked-truth-numbers-game/
  • The Hidden Victims of Campus Sexual assault: Students with Disabilities

    Reporter Azmat Khan spent more than six months investigating the challenges students with disabilities can face when it comes to sexual assault at Gallaudet University, the country’s most renowned school for students with disabilities. It also happens to have the highest rate of “forcible sex offenses” — crime statistics required by the federal Clery Act — of any federally funded university in 2012.
  • ChiMag: Crime Stats

    Written by National Magazine Award finalists David Bernstein and Noah Isackson, this ambitious two-part investigative series, which took the better part of a year to report, exposed how the Chicago Police Department underreported homicides and improperly downgraded scores more serious felonies to lesser offenses in order to bolster the department's crime statistics and make the city appear safer.
  • Flawed Crime Stats at the LAPD

    A Times investigation into the Los Angeles Police Department’s crime statistics found the agency routinely under reported violent crimes. Serious offenses were classified as minor, artificially lowering crime levels reported to the public. The articles prompted a city audit of LAPD crime data and resulted in the department changing its crime reporting procedures. Since those reforms, the LAPD has documented its first increase in crime in more than a decade.
  • Mixed Signals on Substance Abuse at San Diego State

    Following the repercussions of an undercover police drug raid in 2008, San Diego State crime statistics took an interesting turn. After the peak six years ago, the amount of alcohol-related incidents (DUI, Drunk and Disorderly, MIP, and more) steadily dropped, while the amount of students requiring medical transports for alcohol- or drug-related conditions skyrocketed. Madison Hopkins and Leonardo Castaneda, two editors at San Diego State's independent student newspaper, The Daily Aztec, investigated the reasoning behind this trend and what it meant for students.
  • Clery Act Challenges -- Many schools continue to struggle with law or fail to follow guidelines

    This story focused broadly on university compliance with the Clery Act, a federal campus safety law first enacted in the aftermath of a Lehigh University student's murder more than 25 years ago. While schools are expected to be diligent in disclosing campus crime statistics, many institutions do not devote significant manpower to overseeing Clery Act compliance and the intricacies of the law can be a source of confusion.
  • Off Campus Crime

    While the Clery Act requires Texas universities to report on campus crime, they are not required to report any off campus crime that affects their students. The numbers were staggering and showed a clear difference in the safety of students on campus versus off.
  • NYPD: Fighting Crime at All Costs

    WABC closely examined the aggressive policing policies of the NY Police Department. A tip from an officer regarding the use of quotas had turned into "a relentless pursuit of arrests and summonses in the city's minority communities that he claimed led to the write up of innocent people."
  • Wrongful Arrest?

    On a tip that a viewer's 74-year-old father was in jail for a string of Wal-Mart robberies he did not commit, KCTV investigated the challenge of righting a conviction wrong when found on the wrong side of the law.
  • City Rape Statistics Questioned

    The Sun's investigation found that nearly a third of rapes reported in the city were being deemed "untrue or baseless" by detectives. The paper uncovered examples of women being grilled by detectives until they recanted their stories; and in many case reports never made it from street patrol cops to the detectives.