Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "criminal convictions" ...

  • The Baton Rouge Advocate: "Tilting the Scales"

    A Jim Crow law, still on the books in Louisiana, allows for criminal convictions with only 10 of 12 jurors agreeing -- a practice that our analysis shows continues to discriminate against black defendants.
  • In The Name Of The Law

    This 5-part series examines the secrecy surrounding police misconduct in Hawaii and the effect that lack of disclosure has on the public. In1995, after local college journalists had fought and won a court battle to gain access to police disciplinary files, the politically powerful statewide police union convinced the Legislature to keep the records out of public view. We wanted to explore the effects of this major public policy decision and, nearly 20 years later, determine if police and other government officials were doing a good job overseeing misconduct and ensuring that the public was being protected from bad cops. Since the public can’t scrutinize police behavior themselves, we wanted to see what safeguards are in place so we can be confident our police officers, with their extraordinary power over ordinary citizens, are professional and competent. It turns out that police officers throughout the state are regularly disciplined for egregious offenses -- violence, lying, even criminal convictions. But there’s no way to know if they are being effectively disciplined, and it appears police administrators are at the mercy of strong union contracts. Local police commissions and prosecutors either ignore serious cases or can’t do anything about them under the current system.
  • The Hansen Files: Daycare Criminals

    Childcare advocates claim that inadequate state laws have made it easy for people with criminal convictions to get licensed to care for children—often with deadly consequences. Their evidence was often anecdotal--ripped from headlines of children dying in the care of someone whose past wasn't revealed until after the child had been harmed. When we looked into the problem we soon discovered that even when a criminal history disqualifies a potential candidate from childcare, states often grant licenses nonetheless. Parents not only aren’t informed of this, but some states actively conceal this information. And we found there are no existing databases that report caregivers’ criminal records or the results of background checks, so we set out to compile our own. The creation of that database then led us to an extensive, year-long data search in five states, from original arrest reports and police narratives to jail records, court records, state licensing files, exemption reports, inspection records and more. These records helped us unravel the many ways people with criminal records were able to get licensed. We then visited several centers and conducted an experiment in one state, submitting applications for childcare background checks for three women--all of them convicted murderers.
  • Hospital Sexual Assaults

    The reporter investigated sexual assaults on patients at hospitals in the Phoenix area, and the reporting led to criminal convictions for three hospital staff members. In March 2008, the station received an e-mail saying staff at a Scottsdale hospital didn't call police after a stroke patient told them she was sexually assaulted in her bed. After the original report aired, other people came forward with similar stories. After a public records request from the police department, the reporter found sex crimes against patients at about a dozen Phoenix-area hospitals. Most cases were never solved. Ptosecutors criminally charged employees at the original Scottsdale hospital with violations of Arizona's vulnerable adults law. Three were convicted and one received jail time. Several hospitals in the Phoenix are have reviewed and improved their patient security as a result of these reports.
  • Air Marshals: Undercover and Under Arrest

    The Federal Air Marshal Service presents the image of an elite undercover force charged with making life-and-death decisions that demand sound judgment. ProPublica found that dozens of air marshals have been charged with crimes, including 18 felonies, and hundreds more have been accused of misconduct. Cases include smuggling drugs past airport security, aiding a human trafficking ring, child sex abuse, bribery, drunken driving, domestic violence, holding an escort against her will during an overnight layover, solicitation to commit murder and voyeurism after one air marshal was caught taking photos of women's genitals on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.
  • Bus Drivers

    "The Channel 8 I-team investigated the criminal histories of all of Clark County School Bus Drivers. Major findings include: 13% of drivers had come in contact with the courts, either arrested, cited or charged with a crime, 5% of those resulted in convictions, including 6 convictions for driving under the influence."
  • Where Doubt Remains

    This is an online multimedia series about two criminal convictions involving former police chief Lee Jones and Joe Lavigne, both of whom may have been wrongly accused. In 1998, it was alleged that Jones sexually abused two boys and Lavigne was convicted of raping his fiver-year-old daughter in 1996.
  • Where Doubt Remains

    A multimedia investigation "detailing two questionable criminal convictions in West Virginia."
  • Corruption in the Speaker's House

    An "investigation into the activities of N.C. House Speaker Jim Black has directly led to three criminal convictions and contributed significantly to the conviction of a fourth person. The investigation has also sparked the biggest open government reforms in North Carolina since Watergate and resulted in the end of Black's tenure as one of the state's most powerful officials."
  • Policing Hollywood

    The author investigated the Hollywood (FL) Police Department. The three articles look at the cronyism and nepotism in the police force and the firm grip the Police Benevolent Associationon held on the police force. The union largely runs the police force and those that don't fall in step are punished, while loyalists are rewarded with promotions and lucrative off-duty deals even if their police work is sub-standard.