Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "criminal courts" ...

  • Crime and Punishment

    The Chicago Reporter developed a first-of-its-kind series of data-driven stories shedding light on the country's third largest criminal courts system. Each of these stories were built on/based on the same database: More than 11 years’ worth of court records for Cook County. The data set was so rich that we spun it into a series of stories over the year. Collectively, they put consistent picture emerged that put pressure on the judges, police, lawmakers and elected officials who control the criminal justice system.
  • Crime and Punishment

    The Chicago Reporter developed a first-of-its-kind series of data-driven stories shedding light on the country's third largest criminal courts system. Each of these stories were built on/based on the same database: More than 11 years’ worth of court records for Cook County. The data set was so rich that we spun it into a series of stories over the year. Collectively, they put consistent picture emerged that put pressure on the judges, police, lawmakers and elected officials who control the criminal justice system.
  • Striking Differences

    This team of reporters spent two years gathering and analyzing jury data from felony court trials to see if racial discrimination still played a key role in jury selection. The investigation found that prosecutors tend to reject African-American jurors, while defense attorneys tended to retain them. Consequently, the number of African-Americans serving on juries in Dallas more or less mirrored the breakdown of the population.
  • Home Free

    The ABC 7 I-Team found that "every day in U.S. criminal courts, defendants are sentenced to home confinement. The public presumes that the criminals are actually following the court order by staying at home. But our investigation found that even the U.S. Probation Department, which administers home confinement, believes the system is ripe for abuse."
  • Missing Evidence Mystery

    This investigation into the troubled Chicago Police Department drew from a "secret" internal audit and anonymous sources to reveal a spreading pattern of stolen items from the department's evidence vault. The investigation traced some stolen guns all the way back to the hands of criminals.
  • Bad judgment

    Detroit Recorder's Court is one of the busiest criminal courts in the nation, and has earned a reputation for serving up fast food justice. WXYZ exposes the slowest judge in Recorder's Court, where criminals go free, victims are victimized again and tax dollars pay for unnecessary delays.
  • (Untitled)

    The Miami Herald conducted a two-year examination of the criminal courts and found a badly flawed system. Thousands of criminal defendants with money get a free public defense in Dade County. They won expensive luxury cars, fancy houses, and private businesses. Every year, nearly 1,500 felony cases are dropped because police officers fail to meet with prosecutors. (Dec. 17, 18 & 19, 1995)
  • (Untitled)

    Plain Dealer series investigates criminal courts in Cuyahoga County; uses computer to analyze and evaluate 28,000 felony cases. (Supplement: American Bar Association layman's handbook of court procedures.)