Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "dead children" ...

  • BuzzFeed News: The Ghosts of the Orphanage

    As many as 5 million children passed through America’s orphanages in the 20th century alone. In other countries, national investigations have exposed at least some of what transpired in such institutions. But the dark secrets of orphanage life in the US had lain buried, like the dead children who haunt survivors’ dreams — until BuzzFeed News published Christine Kenneally’s unforgettable investigation.
  • The Ghosts of the Orphanage

    As many as 5 million children passed through America’s orphanages in the 20th century alone. In other countries, national investigations have exposed at least some of what transpired in such institutions. But the dark secrets of orphanage life in the US had lain buried, like the dead children who haunt survivors’ dreams — until BuzzFeed News published Christine Kenneally’s unforgettable investigation.
  • Our Dead Children: Why Nebraska Fails as a Parent

    This investigation detailed the failings of Nebraska's child protection system. The reporters focus on one specific case, JayCiona Fleming, to illustrate the lack of time, resources and care that plague the system. Officials are overworked and case workers often are not as strict as they could be; as a result, many children remain in homes with unqualified or addicted parents.
  • Crash Test Kids: Air Bags, Dead Children, and the warning that came too late

    This story exposes neglect and disingenuousness on the part of the automobile industry to emphasize the potentially life-threatening risk airbags in commercial vehicles could pose to small or child passengers. Similar neglect was exhibited by government regulators and even safety advocates, fearing a backlash against the controversial technology and delays in implementing these devices that they say have saved lives.