Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "death row" ...

  • In The Dark Season 2

    In the Dark is an investigative podcast that raises profound questions about whether the criminal justice system in America is fair and just. Season Two investigates the case of Curtis Flowers, a black man on death row in Mississippi who has been tried six times for the same crime. Over 11 episodes, the product of more than a year’s worth of meticulous reporting and data analysis, In the Dark reveals what can happen when the power of a prosecutor goes unchecked.
  • Death Penalty in America

    30 Years on Death Row: In an incredible miscarriage of justice, a prosecutor admits his cowardice and indifference led to the wrongful murder conviction of a man who spent 30 years on death row. The Execution of Joseph Wood: A murderer's execution with a new cocktail of drugs was supposed to take 10 minutes. It took almost two hours, the longest execution in U.S. history. [http://sendvid.com/y1xd84or] [http://sendvid.com/tl6jgyj2]
  • Exposing Missouri's Secret Execution Drug Source

    For the past several months, St. Louis Public Radio's Chris McDaniel and Véronique LaCapra have been investigating Missouri's execution process and the legal and ethical questions around how the state is obtaining its execution drug. Since most drug manufacturers don’t want their products used for lethal injection, Missouri has had to go to great lengths to find a supply. In October, our reporting uncovered that the state had turned to an unauthorized distributor. Then, at the direction of Missouri’s Governor, the Department of Corrections switched to a different execution drug. But they didn’t stop there – they also changed the rules to make it illegal to reveal the source of the drug. After at least a dozen open records requests and numerous interviews with pharmacy experts, our investigation has revealed that the state is obtaining its drug from an Oklahoma compounding pharmacy that isn’t licensed in Missouri. Under normal circumstances, that could be a felony punishable by up to seven years in prison. Our reporting has led lawyers representing Missouri’s death row inmates to file a complaint with the Missouri Board of Pharmacy, demanding they stop the state from illegal importation of its execution drug. And several state lawmakers have called for an appointed commission to investigate the Department of Corrections, and for executions to be put on hold while the General Assembly looks into the issue.
  • Exposing Missouri's Secret Execution Drug Source

    For the past several months, St. Louis Public Radio's Chris McDaniel and Véronique LaCapra have been investigating Missouri's execution process and the legal and ethical questions around how the state is obtaining its execution drug. Since most drug manufacturers don’t want their products used for lethal injection, Missouri has had to go to great lengths to find a supply. In October, our reporting uncovered that the state had turned to an unauthorized distributor. Then, at the direction of Missouri’s Governor, the Department of Corrections switched to a different execution drug. But they didn’t stop there – they also changed the rules to make it illegal to reveal the source of the drug. After at least a dozen open records requests and numerous interviews with pharmacy experts, our investigation has revealed that the state is obtaining its drug from an Oklahoma compounding pharmacy that isn’t licensed in Missouri. Under normal circumstances, that could be a felony punishable by up to seven years in prison. Our reporting has led lawyers representing Missouri’s death row inmates to file a complaint with the Missouri Board of Pharmacy, demanding they stop the state from illegal importation of its execution drug. And several state lawmakers have called for an appointed commission to investigate the Department of Corrections, and for executions to be put on hold while the General Assembly looks into the issue.
  • Trouble in Mind

    Brandi Grissom spent nearly six months investigating the life, trial, conviction and incarceration of Andre Thomas. The six-part series explores the intersections of the mental health and criminal justice systems in Texas through the case of Andre Thomas, a death row inmate who began exhibiting signs of mental illness as a boy and committed a brutal triple murder in 2004. Blind because he pulled out both of his eyes while behind bars, Thomas awaits a federal court's decision on whether he is sane enough to be executed. The series examines the gaps in the Texas mental health system: holes in public education, the troubled juvenile justice system, underfunded mental health care services for adults, unprepared prisons and the still-developing jurisprudence around brain science. In addition to producing six in-depth stories, Grissom partnered with data reporters in the newsroom to produce interactive graphics that helped readers understand that disparities in the mental health system. She also partnered with the graphics team to create a comprehensive interactive timeline that detailed the tragic events of Thomas’ life, his crime, and his case with court documents and photos.
  • The Price of Prisons

    This series of stories, reported over the course of more than six months, examined an out-of-sight, out-of-mind state prison system in Arizona that housed inmates under brutal conditions fostering self-harm, that allowed deadly drugs to flow in from the outside, that left inmates to die from treatable medical conditions and that failed to protect inmates from prison predators. It revealed that over the prior two years needless, preventable deaths had claimed at least five times as many Arizona inmates (37) as had been executed from death row (7), but that systematic cover-ups by the Department of Corrections of the causes of death likely obscured additional preventable death. It revealed a prison suicide rate 60 percent above the national prison average, largely due to the practice of confining mentally-ill prisoners in maximum-security isolation that aggravated their conditions. It revealed how inmates had ready access to heroin, with at least seven lives claimed by overdoses in two years; how shortfalls in medical care, often led to needless suffering, expensive medical complications and death; and how a failure to control prison gangs helped lead to a homicide rate more than double the national correctional average.
  • Cracked

    Fetlz's investigation "exposes how junk science has allowed Texas to keep mentally retarded inmates on death row - and execute several of them - despite a 2002 Supreme Court decision, Atkins v. Virginia, that bans such punishment for these defendants.
  • The Forensic Test

    Dennis Lawley was found guilty of murder in 1989 but new forensic methods are calling his conviction into question 19 years later.
  • Writs Gone Wrong

    The Austin American-Statesman investigates as writs of habeas corpus are found to have errors when submitted to the court. These writs are essential in death row appeals because they "help ensure that the right person will be executed and that verdicts are obtained in accordance with the U.S. and state constitutions." But the newspaper found that "court appointed lawyers routinely submit shockingly botched writs applications. Some are incomplete, incomprehensible or improperly argued. Others are duplicated, poorly, from previous appeals." Yet, these lawyers are not held accountable for these mistakes.
  • Someone Has To Die Tonight

    The Lords of Chaos, a group of teenage boys on Ft. Myers, FL, went on a crime spree that ended with the murder of a high school band director. Their crimes included theft, vandalism and blowing up a Coca-Cola building. They even planned, but never had a chance to commit, a racially-motivated mass murder at Walt Disney World. As author Jim Greenhill conducted interviews and got to know the group's ringleader on Death Row, the ringleader and his mother asked the author to arrange the murders of three witnesses. Greenhill delves into how these young boys went so horribly bad.