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Search results for "dispatch delay" ...

  • 911 Dispatch Delay

    In November of 2012, a man dialed 911 for help from his apartment which had caught fire. The fire spread quickly while he was on the phone with 911. The fire took his life. An internal investigation that began the next morning and continued for the next year determined a failure to properly dispatch the fire department led to a nearly five minute delay in response. It was only the second time in the history of the Onondaga County 911 center a dispatch delay had led, in part, to a fatality. The delay was never revealed. Not to the man's family, the fire department or the public. Three years after the fire our investigation of more than eight months led to all of those parties learning of the deadly delay. We also discovered the dispatcher who was determined to be at fault served no punishment and was not retrained. http://cnycentral.com/news/local/911-commissioner-5-minute-dispatch-delay-blamed-partly-for-fiery-death http://cnycentral.com/news/local/fire-victim-tells-911-call-taker-i-dont-want-to-die-during-dispatch-delay https://youtu.be/WqkQpYKN65E https://youtu.be/TAsu2G4oWpo https://youtu.be/vLbMZltc-sE https://youtu.be/IGy14aM64GI
  • 911 Dispatch Delays

    This investigation started with a tip that the local fire chief and EMS director were concerned about how long it was taking 911 dispatchers to dispatch emergency calls. WJHL's investigation, which was the result of multiple public records requests, uncovered one fatal fire call that took more than three-and-a-half minutes to dispatch despite callers providing fairly specific information. They also found out the dispatch center started improving its times following that fire. The director also made a public commitment for the first time to continue improving those times. After that investigation, they began requesting public records for other dispatch centers and discovered what appeared to be an even bigger problem in the neighboring county.