Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "diversity" ...

  • Silicon Valley’s Hidden Figures

    Silicon Valley has a big diversity problem. But no one has been able to comprehensively quantify it until now. Some of the multibillion-dollar companies that fuel the global economy have sought to hide how few women and people of color they have in their organizations, refusing to release the data, claiming the information is a trade secret. We built the largest and most comprehensive database of diversity employment data for Silicon Valley available. Through a groundbreaking collaboration with a University of Massachusetts Amherst sociologist, we got Equal Employment Opportunity Council (EEOC) data for 177 of the largest tech companies through public records requests and a successful FOIA lawsuit. Through this data, we uncovered disparities and ranked companies based on their diversity scores. By establishing a baseline of comparative data, we were able to hold companies accountable for their diversity hiring practices for the first time. Because of our analysis, the public now knows some of the worst companies when it comes to diversity in Silicon Valley. But we also found that diversity is not an impossible goal to achieve for technology companies: some are doing much better than their peers.
  • WUFT: Cost of Sunshine

    Public record requests of various county and local governments were made in an effort to determine the number of public record requests received by each governmental unit, the cost to provide access to the requested records, the fees recovered from requestors, and copies of agency public record access policies. Those governmental units not audited received a survey designed to obtain the same information sought in the public record requests. Public record requests included all county constitutional officers in nine Florida counties as well as the city clerk in the county seat. County constitutional officers include the state attorney; sheriff; clerk of court; tax collector; property appraiser; supervisor of elections; public defender; and school superintendent. Counties were chosen based on geographic and population diversity. Six state agencies were also included: Executive Office of Governor, Attorney General,Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Department of Financial Services, Department of Juvenile Justice, Department of Veteran’s Affairs.
  • Military.com: Aviators Kicked Out

    The U.S. military prides itself on its colorblind attitude to race and its increasing diversity. Why, then, does the field of naval aviation remain overwhelmingly white, and less diverse in some areas now than two decades ago? Three black aviators who share remarkably similar stories of getting expelled from the training pipeline say unconscious bias is to blame. These former trainees, some of whom remain in appeals with the Navy, say they're just as good as their white peers, and an instructor backs their assertions. Investigations, formal complaints, and a troubling aviation instructors' chat history paint a picture of an environment that dooms minority aviators from the moment they set foot on the flightline.
  • MU's Asian students reluctant to report episodes of discrimination, racism

    The story is to reveal untold stories related to racial discrimination against MU's Asian students. While Na was speaking with more than 100 Asian students and several MU officials who were devising a diversity training that would be mandated for MU freshmen to take, he found several Asian students had undergone obvious racial mistreatment, but were not willing to report; and MU officials did not know of these racial instances suffered among MU Asian students.
  • 5 years later, city fails diversity vow

    The focus of this project was the level of diversity within the municipality of Norwich, Conn., and whether the racial diversity of employees in city departments reflected the community at large. The stories reflected the findings in three areas: municipal, employees, police department employees, and school district employees.
  • A Collaborative Investigative Reporting Initiative

    The Georgia News Lab is an award-wining investigative reporting collaborative. Its mission is to train a new generation of investigative journalists and help increase diversity in newsrooms. The project is a partnership between four of the top college journalism programs in Georgia (the University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Morehouse College, and Clark Atlanta University) and two of the dominant news outlets in the Southeast (the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and WSB-TV, an ABC affiliate). Through this unique collaboration, students learn advanced reporting techniques, work side by side with professional reporters, produce major investigative stories, and prepare for careers in investigative journalism. http://www.wsbtv.com/news/news/local/student-project-leads-ethics-investigation-subpoen/nm8r6/
  • The Changing Face of America

    Most data-driven discussions about race focus either on the national level (which masks local trends) or are centered on areas of conflict (such as Ferguson, Mo.) USA TODAY wanted to give people the tools that would allow them to explore how race end ethnicity have changed over time -- where they live and where they go to school. But how do you measure diversity when such trends wax and wane over time? Is a community that changed from nearly all-white to all-black as diverse as an area that received a high level of immigrants? Why do some communities barely notice big changes over time, while others become a nexus of violence? And how does the change in my community compare to anyone else's? To do that USA TODAY needed a tool to level the playing field, a way to show 100 years of change both locally and nationally, on the same scale. The series, based on the USA TODAY Diversity Index, is explanatory data at its best: quantifying incremental change that everyone sees anecdotally.
  • Fire Academy Diversity

    WBAL-TV exposed the fact that the Baltimore City Fire Department had abandoned its policy regarding recruitment designed to make the agency more diverse. The department has a history of overlooking minorities in recruiting and promotions. 63.2% of Bailtimore is African-American, but out of a 45 class of cadets, only 5 were African-American and 3 were women.
  • Dairyland Diversity

    Wisconsin's dairy industry has seen an influx of immigrant laborers in recent years. While the workers have contributed to growth in the industry, they have also put the farmers in potential legal peril.
  • Abuse of Power

    This series is an investigation into former CSUPD Chief Dexter Yarbrough. Before the investigation began, he had been placed on paid administrative leave and this raised suspicion from J. David McSwane. After much research and interviewing, David revealed a number of cases of misconduct by Yarbrough. These cases of misconduct included sexual harassment and other illegal behaviors. After everything was revealed, Yarbrough resigned and now hiring of university officials and police personnel is highly assessed.