Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "domestic violence" ...

  • A Forgotten Crisis

    Melissa, Tara and Amanda interviewed dozens of military spouses, across every branch, all over the country. Then they cross-referenced their stories to identify the biggest problems and gaps in the system. Finally, they tracked down domestic violence experts, military leaders and others to add critical context and comment. It took over a year to report. The result was five articles that dug into the challenges faced by domestic violence victims in the military: a structure that favors the abuser in which commanders determine if a crime has been committed, a family advocacy program that, in some instances, upholds outdated beliefs about gender roles, and a lack of support for victims who face enormous financial consequences if they choose to leave their partners. HuffPost’s investigation found that service members are rarely investigated or punished for acts of domestic violence. Because of this lack of accountability, many victims we interviewed are still afraid of their former partners. Some have been unable to get protective orders because there is no official record of their partner’s abuse, as paperwork does not travel seamlessly from the military world to the civilian one.
  • Getting Guns Out of Dangerous Hands

    KING 5's reporting led to a new law in Washington state and a new task force targeting people who are prohibited from owning guns. The stories focused on gun laws that are supposed to keep firearms out of the hands of two classes of dangerous people: Those with criminal records, and those accused of domestic violence. Two separate series of investigative reports revealed that those laws were not enforced by the criminal justice system, and victims were paying for that with their lives.
  • Dying for Change: Domestic Violence Victims & Law Enforcement Failures

    In more than a dozen reports followed by a 30 minute in depth special report, the Denver7 investigative team exposed a series of critical law enforcement breakdowns in the handling of fatal and near fatal domestic violence calls. At a time when this critical issue is under the national microscope the breakdowns exposed in this reporting brought changes in several law enforcement agencies and have sparked lawmakers to review current reporting and oversight requirements in Colorado and to consider new legislation in the coming session. https://vimeo.com/user22591361/review/198500061/f0f5da3ab0
  • Voiceless

    "Voiceless" exposes a flawed system in which access to interpretation and translation services can spell the difference between life and death for Spanish-speaking victims of domestic violence in New York City.
  • Domestic Violence Dismissals

    “Domestic Violence Dismissals” analyzed the complex institution behind domestic violence court cases, specifically focusing on the high rate of case dismissals. On average, only 20 percent of cases of domestic violence in Athens County, Ohio, are prosecuted. The majority of the remaining 80 percent are dismissed, with a smaller percentage – but still substantial amount – of cases reduced to a lesser charge. Cases are dismissed for a multitude of reasons, often including a lack of response from the victim or a victims’ unwillingness to prosecute. The story further delved into the nuance of dismissing a domestic violence case.
  • Police Wife: The Secret Epidemic of Domestic Violence

    "Police Wife" shows that spousal abuse is much more prevalent in police homes than in the wider population and that most police departments do little to stop it. The book also shows that the problem has impacts well beyond police families and is connected to a wide range of other issues, including botched responses to 911 domestic calls at other homes, police sexual harassment of women cops and female drivers at traffic stops, police killings of African Americans and growing social inequality. This is by all evidence the first book worldwide in journalistic form on this issue.
  • Where Have All the Lawyers Gone?

    “Where Have All the Lawyers Gone?” identifies the shortage of affordable and pro bono legal services in Santa Barbara County and the impact that shortage has on society’s most vulnerable segments such as the homeless and working poor, especially in dealing with civil rights abuses, law enforcement issues, domestic violence, evictions and other legal issues that compound into bigger problems without accessible legal help. The story found that only about one-third of the legal needs of the county’s poor (14 percent of the county’s population lives under the poverty line) were being met. Although the California State Bar recommends that firms provide 50 hours of pro bono work a year, lawyers in the area admitted “there’s never been a culture of pro bono” in the area, and the firms that do participate are more likely to work with non-profits than poor individuals. An investigation revealed a glaring deficit in pro bono and affordable legal care in a town with more than its fair share of nonprofits and foundations dedicated to social issue
  • Two Gunshots

    From the moment the police found Michelle O’Connell, a young, single mother, dying from a gunshot to the head, there were troubling questions about what happened inside the house in St. Augustine, Florida. The fatal shot came from the service weapon of her boyfriend, a local sheriff’s deputy. O’Connell had just broken up with him and was packing to move out of his house. And barely an hour before she died, O’Connell had texted her sister to say she would soon be there to pick up her four-year-old daughter. Yet, none of this troubled detectives from the St. John’s County Sheriff’s – all fellow officers of O’Connell’s boyfriend. Within hours, they concluded that O’Connell had committed suicide. Those critical questions remained unanswered for nearly two years, until Walt Bogdanich, an investigative reporter for The New York Times, began examining the death of Michelle O’Connell – a case that had deeply divided law enforcement agencies in Florida and raised broader issues of how the police investigate one of their own, particularly in instances of domestic violence. Bogdanich found that the criminal justice system had failed almost from the moment the fatal shot was fired. Evidence wasn’t collected. Neighbors weren’t canvassed. Important interviews were not conducted. Medical examiners concocted absurd theories to support the suicide conclusion and prosecutors blindly endorsed them. The Times’s investigation, conducted in conjunction with the PBS investigative program Frontline, was part of a broader examination of how the police deal with the corrosive and persistent problem of domestic violence in their ranks.
  • A 911 Call's Deadly Aftermath

    In 2013 the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette followed up on a tip that police visited the house of a woman 24 hours before she was killed in response to her disconnected 911 call. We quickly learned that there were numerous problems with the police response, which we documented in a series of stories. Police never spoke to or saw the caller; they talked only to a man at the house through a window (who turned out to be her killer); they never called a supervisor for guidance; and they could have been more aggressive in their efforts. We also reported that the situation was eerily similar to one 25 years earlier. Our stories led to new police protocols for handling domestic violence and “unknown trouble” calls as well as new powers for the Pittsburgh Citizen Police Review Board to review future police bureau policies.
  • Judge Berates Domestic Violence Victim

    Judge’s treatment of a woman seeking protection from her husband