Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "donation" ...

  • Doing the Math: Behind a $5 Million Inauguration

    For nearly a year, the Texas Tribune’s Shannon Najmabadi and Jay Root have been on the hunt for records detailing the state’s spending on Gov. Greg Abbott’s 2019 inauguration. From a source, they obtained a program and fundraising solicitation for the celebration. The documents revealed that dozens of influential corporations and individuals — AT&T Corporation; H-E-B grocery; a handful of political appointees — had donated thousands of dollars for front-row access during the festivities — and, perhaps, beyond.
  • Zombie Campaigns

    Zombie Campaigns is an in-depth look at the spending habits of 102 former congresspeople who kept spending campaign donations as if they were still campaigning well after they left office. The reporting uncovered a wealth of personal spending and shone a light on loopholes that allowed some politicians to continue spending for decades after they retired, and in some cases even after they died. Along with the story, we published a searchable database of spending by those candidates we identified as running a zombie campaign.
  • Postmedia: Follow the Money

    Follow the Money is a data journalism project conceived by reporter Zane Schwartz as part of a year-long Postmedia fellowship. “I was frustrated by the way donations to politicians are recorded,” says Schwartz. “We know money matters in politics, but figuring out who is consistently giving that money to candidates and parties requires a level of detective-work out of reach for the average voter.” To address this gap, Schwartz worked with a team of journalists at Postmedia to create an accessible search tool for contributions at both the federal level and in every province and territory — a first of its kind.
  • In Donors We Trust

    Everyone knows that college is more and more expensive to attend. So why are college and university endowments skyrocketing and now worth more than $567 billion? We started with the University of Michigan, lauded as one of the world’s best public universities which had stockpiled an endowment worth more than $11 billion. We found that university officials invested a good chunk of that endowment – one of the country’s largest among public institutions - in hundreds of private funds across the world. More importantly, our months-long investigation identified a select group who had secretly benefited: top university donors and alumni investment advisers who run private equity, hedge and venture capital funds and real estate investment firms. After our stories published throughout 2018, the university changed its investment policies; rerouted nearly $2 million into more student aid; made new investments based in the state; publicly released university executive compensation information after losing a FOIA lawsuit brought by the Free Press; and saw two university regents (i.e., trustees) lose their elections in November to those who promised more financial transparency and accountability based on our reporting.
  • Center for Responsive Politics: Tracking Trump’s ‘Dark Money’ Networks

    CRP’s series of investigations using data from FCC political ad records, tax documents and other resources to piece together a network of nonprofits supporting President Donald Trump’s agenda revealed that the Trump campaign funneled money to ad buyers alleged to have facilitated an illegal coordination scheme routing funds through a previously unreported shell company. Our research also identified exclusive financial information about groups and individuals tied to a mysterious LLC that made a $1 million donation to the inaugural committee.
  • Cash & the Court

    A reporter's curiosity about campaign contributions to judicial candidates from six law firms — five from outside Arkansas — leads to a 17 month-long investigation and results in revelations that raise questions about the impartiality of the state's Supreme Court. http://www.arkansasonline.com/cashandthecourt/
  • Charity Caught on Camera

    As an Indiana charity collected $7 million in donations, this undercover WTHR investigation exposed stunning mismanagement that violated public trust. Months of surveillance and undercover video revealed (literally) tons of food and donations intended for the homeless shelter never made it to the homeless at all. Instead, much of the food went directly to the charity’s leaders – some of the most respected and powerful clergy in the community – who took the food for themselves, their friends, their family members, and even for their pets. The managerial abuses, neglect and dangerous living conditions uncovered by WTHR’s 13 Investigates team prompted immediate resignations, ongoing local and state investigations, and significant changes to protect the charity’s homeless residents and its donors. http://www.wthr.com/tags/grant-county-rescue-mission-13-investigates
  • Compensating for Mass Murder

    This business feature examines how U.S. communities distribute the private donations given to help mass shooting survivors and victims’ families and how the lack of a national protocol affects locally-based victim compensation decisions.
  • Canada’s Jewish Schindler

    VICE News' reporter Rachel Browne investigates the Liberation of Christian and Yazidi Children of Iraq, which claimed to be using the group's funds to rescue hundreds of Yazidi women and girls who had been captured as slaves by Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria. Browne was the first person to report on their concerns and allegations that he was committing a fraud, and actually using his donation money to pay Yazidi families to say he rescued their family members.
  • Tax evasion in Princeton's eating clubs

    This was an investigation into how Princeton's eating clubs raise millions of dollars to pay for lavish renovations of their social facilities, including taprooms, lounges and dining halls. The investigation found that the leadership of the 12 eating clubs had over time set up a handful of "educational" foundations to hand out tax breaks to their donors. These donations directly violated IRS guidelines. Had the donors given money directly to the clubs, they would have received no tax benefits.