Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "drug cartels" ...

  • Juarez, A Fragile Peace

    This investigation was among the first ones to look back in time and write a poignant narrative on how the battle between the Juarez and Sinaloa drug cartels and the co-option of police forces as fighters for their criminal causes, turned the streets of this U.S.-Mexico border city into rivers of blood. It focused on how peace was obtained in 2012 with a combination of civic and government involvement, the arrival of a top tough-as-nails police chief who cleaned up the police, and intelligence provided by DEA informants that help jail top drug leaders, thus diffusing the fight.
  • Between Borders: American Migrant Crisis

    Each week, hundreds of young people—teenagers and children—attempt to flee the gang warfare that has gripped large swaths of Central America, heading north, crossing thousands of miles in hopes of obtaining asylum or settling with relatives in the United States. From October 2013 through July of this year, nearly 80,000 unaccompanied minors arrived at our southern border. In this powerful documentary for The New York Times, Pulitzer Center grantees Brent and Craig Renaud trace the journey from the violent streets of San Pedro Sula, Honduras through Guatemala and across the Suchiate River aboard flimsy rafts to Mexico. From there, some try to hop “the Beast”—a slow-moving freight train. Others hitchhike or simply make the long trek on foot. No matter the method they choose, the risk of arrest by authorities, abuse by human traffickers or abduction by drug cartels is a constant danger. As the debate on immigration takes center stage in the Republican presidential primary campaign, the Renaud brothers look at the causes and conditions that compel children to stake their lives on this dangerous journey. “Between Borders: American Migrant Crisis” shows us the reality of the so-called “illegals” who seek safe shelter in America. http://www.nytimes.com/video/world/americas/100000003901101/central-america-child-migrants.html http://pulitzercenter.org/education/meet-journalists-renaud-honduras
  • License to Launder: Cash, cops and cartels: A Miami Herald investigation

    The Miami Herald's License to Launder exposed an undercover police task force that turned a sting operation into an unchecked cash machine for police and their informants, laundering $71.5 million for drug cartels -- reaping millions in profits for brokering the deals -- then returned the rest to the same criminal groups without making a single arrest.
  • "Under the Curse of Cartels"

    This project gave readers an unprecedented look at the highly-organized drug trafficking organizations that had taken control of Oregon's drug underworld. This was not just a report about drug dealing. This was about execution-style murders never before publicly linked to Mexican drug cartels. This was about tracing how a cartel-linked trafficker set up a national drug distribution network from rural towns in Oregon. This was about the price paid by end users, including a harrowing account of a young man's death from a heroin overdose. Drug arrests were not news in Oregon. Police agencies routinely issue press releases, prosecutors hold news conferences, and photos of seized drugs and money handed out. That's where the coverage often ends. "Under the Curse of Cartels" documented the true scale behind this drug trafficking -- the sophisticated organizations, their ruthless control, and their elaborate counter-surveillance efforts to detect police investigations. The project took reporting on drug trafficking to a new level with the intimate insider details from both sides of the law. The series was a shocking wake up for Oregon, including many in the law enforcement community who didn't have access to the kind of information collated by The Oregonian.
  • Gunwalkers

    CBS News broke and developed the story of the Gunwalker Scandal. US Federal agents covertly helped deliver thousands of assault rifles and other weapons to killer Mexican Drug Cartels.
  • Gunwalker

    A story uncovering how U.S. federal agents covertly helped deliver thousands of assault rifles and other weapons to killer Mexican drug cartels.
  • "Failed Drug War"

    The AP launched an investigation to determine whether or not the policies put into place by the U.S. War on Drugs were working. By using 40 years worth of FOIAed federal health surveys and drug strategies, and by interviewing members of Congress involved in the voting on drug policies, the AP concluded that the drug war has failed. Some sources interviewed for the story suggested that the problem has actually intensified.
  • "The War Next Door"

    Violence has increased in Mexico as the government cracks down on the drug cartels. Murders and kidnappings have increased, and Mexican citizens are afraid to leave their homes. Interviews with the Mexican Attorney General and Secretary of Homeland Security reveal the role of the U.S. in combating the problem. A jailhouse interview with a prominent female drug smuggler gives insight to the workings of the drug trafficking world.
  • Marijuana Inc.

    Flying over northern California, you will see row upon row of marijuana fields. These rows are worth multi-millions and are left in plain sight. This is “evidence of a lucrative, but also increasingly violent, underground pot industry”. This industry has become a large part of that county’s economy. Many people in this industry are turning to guns as protection, robberies in search of drug stashes, and arrival of Mexican drug cartels.
  • "Mexico Drug Wars"

    AP reporters investigate how repercussions of the Mexican drug wars have mowed over the border and have settled on U.S. soil. They also reveal that the U.S. is the biggest supplier of weapons to the "gangsters" and also offers drug lords a lucrative market.