Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "drug smuggling" ...

  • The Catch

    "The Catch" is documentary investigation that found Canada may be complicit in violating international law because the country’s navy and air force assists the U.S. Coast Guard to police international waters and capture suspected drug smugglers, some of whom have reported mistreatment on board U.S. Coast Guard vessels.
  • Border Patrol

    We believe this is the most extensive investigation on the U.S. border conducted by a Sunday news program in 2016. We begin by revealing one of the biggest issues that’s gotten lost in the debate over illegal immigration: the disturbing increase in drug smuggling. In Border Control, we find evidence that our southern border is not under U.S. control. In Tunnel Vision, we expose some of the underground tunnels that cartels have used to smuggle drugs and people into the U.S. In Bordertown, USA, we provide an unusual profile of a U.S. border town so influenced by illegal smugglers and drugs, that the culture has worked its way into the fabric of daily life: Douglas, Arizona. In Crossing the Line, we take an eye opening look at the corruption inside U.S. Customs and Border Protection. And in Cuban Exodus, we exclusively reveal the “mind-boggling” number of Cubans surging across the Mexican border into the U.S.
  • Saric

    The book "Saric" follows the rise of the Balkan narco-cartel and details its drug smuggling, money laundering, and corruption of politicians and businesses. The year 2004 was a breakthrough for Balkan organized crime. After Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Đinđić was assassinated in 2003, police dismantled most of crime groups in the country. Big criminals understood that to keep operating they had to change and operate smarter. They did. They formed a syndicate, they stoped selling drugs inside the country and they moved into European markets. Through their new cartel they earned billions and have used it to buy political parties, police and control over the economies of Serbia, Montenegro and other countries.
  • The Deadliest Place in Mexico

    The Juarez Valley, a narrow corridor of green farmland carved from the Chihuahuan desert along the Rio Grande, was once known for its cotton, which rivaled Egypt’s. But that was before the Juarez cartel moved in to set up a lucrative drug smuggling trade. “The Deadliest Place in Mexico” explores untold aspects of Mexico’s drug war as it has played out in the small farming communities of this valley. The violence began in 2008, when the Sinaloa cartel moved in to take over the Juarez cartel’s turf. The Mexican government sent in the military to quell the violence — but instead the murder rate exploded. While the bloodshed in the nearby City of Juarez attracted widespread media attention, the violence spilling into the rural Juarez Valley received far less, eve as the killings began to escalate in brutal ways. Community advocates, elected officials, even police officers were shot down in the streets. Several residents were stabbed in the face with ice picks. By 2009, the valley, with a population of 20,000, had a murder rate six times higher than Juarez itself. Newspapers began to call the rural farming region the “Valley of Death.” This investigation uses extensive Freedom of Information Act requests, court documents, and difficult-to-obtain interviews in Spanish and English with current and former Juarez Valley residents, Mexican officials, narcotraffickers and U.S. and Mexican law enforcement officials, to reveal that many of these shocking deaths were perpetrated with the participation of Mexican authorities. It shows scenes of devastation — households where six members of a single family were killed, without a single police investigation. It uncovers targeted killings by masked gunmen of community activists and innocent residents for speaking out against violence and repression facilitated by corrupt military and government officials. And it gathers multiple witnesses who describe soldiers themselves, working in league with the Sinaloa cartel, perpetrating violence against civilians. "The cemeteries are all full. There isn't anywhere left to bury the bodies," one former resident said. "You'll find nothing there but ghost towns and soldiers."
  • Documenting Russian Federation Corruption

    With documentation from several secret bank accounts and offshore corporate records, Barron's Dow Jones traced how Russia's most powerful officials have looted their nation in cahoots with cops, gangsters, and oligarchs. They show how a worldwide network of money laundering professionals that facilitates that plunder, while also abetting other global mischief like drug smuggling and arms trafficking.
  • "The War Next Door"

    Violence has increased in Mexico as the government cracks down on the drug cartels. Murders and kidnappings have increased, and Mexican citizens are afraid to leave their homes. Interviews with the Mexican Attorney General and Secretary of Homeland Security reveal the role of the U.S. in combating the problem. A jailhouse interview with a prominent female drug smuggler gives insight to the workings of the drug trafficking world.
  • Series on Congressman Jerry Weller

    Congressman Jerry Weller (R-Ill.) is married to a foreign government official, Zury Rios Sosa, daughter of former Guatemalan dictator Efrain Rios Montt. Weller is a member of a committee "whose main focus is Latin America," and "has been silent about Guatemalan problems that affect the U.S., particularly drug smuggling." The investigation also found that Weller failed to report on his congressional disclosure form the amount of beachfront property he owns in Nicaragua, putting him in "violation of house ethics rules and U.S. law."
  • The Royal Treatment

    While their countries suffer from conflict and civil unrest, some of Saudi Arabia's most prestigious princes are living it up on the French Riviera. According to this investigation, instead of dealing with the violent attacks on their country, these men were on vacation and involved with drug smuggling, prostitution and violence.
  • The Drug War

    In trying to answer the question, "How effective is the Drug War," the National Journal reports on the drug war's history and societyal effects. Special sections are devoted to users, prevention, interdiction, treatment and punishmet as the Journal examines this complex issue.
  • Crossing to the Other Side: Deadly Game

    Village Voice, in a three part series, reports on "one Mexican's illegal journey into the United States." Reporter Michael Kamber describes 18 year-old Antonio Gonzalez's trip across border lines and his journey to New York City In addition, the article details the system of "coyotes" who smuggle Mexicans into the United States and how they bypass Border Patrol.