Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "drug trafficking" ...

  • Cops and Robbers

    This series charts the path of perhaps the most corrupt officer to wear a Baltimore Police badge, from his history of ignored complaints of abuse and untruthfulness to showing the depths of crimes uncovered by a federal investigation, including drug trafficking and robbery. The story maps out how the corruption was not an isolated event confined to a particular unit, but rather ingrained in the culture of “plainclothes” police units long relied on to combat crime. It exposes new allegations, and educates readers who might otherwise not understand the negative effects of aggressive policing employed in Baltimore’s most high-crime neighborhoods.
  • 60 Minutes: Inside the Epidemic

    Bill Whitaker continues to investigate the origins of the opioid epidemic with a rare prison interview with a pain clinic doctor sentenced to 157 years for drug trafficking.
  • Univision: A Tall Tale or Un cuento chino in Spanish

    A Tall Tale tells the story of a Chinese businessman who was arrested for drug trafficking after $205 million was seized from his Mexico City mansion and the political and corporate interests that underpinned his prosecution.
  • Despite multiple malpractice payouts, doctors often keep practicing

    This story looked at how effective medical boards are at stopping dangerous doctors from practicing medicine. We used a state database to identify the 25 Florida doctors with the most malpractice payouts since 2000. We then looked at how many of these doctors had been stopped from practicing by the Florida Board of Medicine. Turns out, just four of them lost their licenses - and three of those four only lost them after they had been arrested and charged with either drug trafficking or billing fraud. The fourth lost his license after he failed to comply with the terms of a lesser punishment. In other words, not a single one of them had been stopped from practicing due to poor medical care.
  • "Under the Curse of Cartels"

    This project gave readers an unprecedented look at the highly-organized drug trafficking organizations that had taken control of Oregon's drug underworld. This was not just a report about drug dealing. This was about execution-style murders never before publicly linked to Mexican drug cartels. This was about tracing how a cartel-linked trafficker set up a national drug distribution network from rural towns in Oregon. This was about the price paid by end users, including a harrowing account of a young man's death from a heroin overdose. Drug arrests were not news in Oregon. Police agencies routinely issue press releases, prosecutors hold news conferences, and photos of seized drugs and money handed out. That's where the coverage often ends. "Under the Curse of Cartels" documented the true scale behind this drug trafficking -- the sophisticated organizations, their ruthless control, and their elaborate counter-surveillance efforts to detect police investigations. The project took reporting on drug trafficking to a new level with the intimate insider details from both sides of the law. The series was a shocking wake up for Oregon, including many in the law enforcement community who didn't have access to the kind of information collated by The Oregonian.
  • Policing For Profit

    NewsChannel 5's award-winning investigative team wrapped up a two-year investigation into practices that some call "policing for profit" with a primetime documentary that aired Friday, Dec. 21. The one-hour special included actual police "dashcam" videos of officers seizing cash from out-of-state drivers and extended interviews that have never been aired. The documentary examines civil forfeiture laws that allow Tennessee police to legally take cash from individuals based on suspicion that the money might be linked to drug trafficking. If an individual does not take legal action to recover the money, the police agency gets to keep it all – sometimes to pay the salaries of the officers seizing the cash. As our investigation showed, such "profit motives" create the potential for corruption.
  • Sheila Devereaux Freed From Prison

    A synopsis of Sheila Devereux's false conviction of drug trafficking and sentence to prison is investigated, as well as the policemen who were involved in the Devereux's case were investigated for corruption.
  • Mexico: La Espiral del Silencio

    The investigation looked at self-censorship in 11 provincial Mexican newspapers in relation to to drug-related stories and found that 70 percent were publishing only one out of ten stories related to drug trafficking.
  • "The War Next Door"

    Violence has increased in Mexico as the government cracks down on the drug cartels. Murders and kidnappings have increased, and Mexican citizens are afraid to leave their homes. Interviews with the Mexican Attorney General and Secretary of Homeland Security reveal the role of the U.S. in combating the problem. A jailhouse interview with a prominent female drug smuggler gives insight to the workings of the drug trafficking world.
  • "Chapin Narco-connection from Guatemala to New York"

    Drug trafficking is on the rise in Guatemala. About "200 tons of cocaine" passes through the country annually on its way to New York. Drug-violence in the country is spreading, reaching levels comparable to that of Mexico. Authorities are only catching a small percentage of the drugs being smuggled, as well as the people who are doing the trafficking.