Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "drunk" ...

  • Houston Chronicle: Out of Control

    When new residents of Houston first hit the roads, many come to the same realization: This is not normal. The highways are a labyrinthine mess. The motorists drive at extraordinarily high speed, often distracted. At night, drunk drivers weave in and out of traffic. Those factors lead to daily tragedy. Chronicle reporters knew the carnage was unusual. In 2016, they began investigating the scope of the problem. The findings: the greater Houston region was the nation’s deadliest major metro area for roadway fatalities, with more than 640 deaths annually – or the equivalent of three fully loaded 737s crashing and killing all aboard, every year. They found declining speeding enforcement, even as deaths rose. They also discovered similar results with DWI and distracted driving enforcement.
  • Boston Globe: Massachusetts State Police Turmoil

    In a series of stories throughout 2018, the Globe uncovered instances of corruption within the state’s largest law enforcement agency, revealing numerous institutional failures and costly missteps. The reporters uncovered several cases of misconduct, such as a trooper’s history of racist online posts, a trooper's failures to halt a drunk driver and stop a fatal crash, and supervisors who never questioned a trooper’s drug dealing past. In the wake of these stories, the department opened internal inquiries.
  • FLIPPED: Secrets Inside a Corrupt Police Department

    A year-long investigation by a one-man-band investigative reporter revealed institutional and systemic failures inside a large Metro Atlanta police department. By cultivating internal police sources, he was able to demand specific, hidden public records that uncovered the following scandals the Roswell Police Department tried to keep secret from the public: Officers arrested a driver for speeding using a ‘coin flip’ app; Police covered up a K9 brutally mauling a teen suspect who had already surrendered; Top sergeant intentionally froze a 13-year-old boy to get him to tell the truth; Department concealed the release of a suspected drunk driver - one of its own officers; and Officer failed to help a dying prisoner because that officer was already under investigation. This investigation and public records fight resulted in the resignation of the police chief, the firing of three police officers, and an overhaul of the city's open records system to improve public access.
  • Free to Flee

    In Florida, drunk drivers are routinely not arrested immediately after they cause a fatal crash, even when there’s sufficient probable cause to arrest them. In many cases, the drivers remain free as the investigations drag on for many months, well beyond accepted standards. Our investigation found that dozens of drunk drivers have escaped justice and hundreds more were left on the streets for years before being arrested and convicted, with some committing other crimes while they enjoyed their freedom.
  • Fan Safety at Arrowhead

    In the wake of 9/11 and more recent terrorist attacks, the NFL has made fan safety at football stadiums a top priority. But we uncovered another kind of terror that's not getting much attention: fights caused by drunk, unruly fans. Our investigation revealed there are more reports of fights and assaults at Arrowhead than at stadiums in similar sized markets. In 2013, one of those Arrowhead fights claimed the life of a young man and father of a seven-week-old baby. His family and others assaulted at Arrowhead say there isn't enough security at the stadium to protect fans. http://fox4kc.com/2015/11/23/critics-say-violence-isnt-limited-to-collisions-on-the-gridiron-at-arrowhead-stadium/
  • Drunk and Still Driving

    3 train derailments in a row, including one that forced a neighborhood to evacuate has jolted local residents. Fortunately, no one was killed in these accidents, but it's raising some questions.
  • Impact Zones

    We crunched three years worth of drunk driving crash data for southeast Wisconsin to find places that are magnets for drunk driving accidents. We pinpoint the specific stretches of roads where you are most likely to be hit by a drunk driver. Through the personal stories of people hurt by these drunk drivers, we look for the reasons why police in these communities deal with so many drunk drivers. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3at4fs5y1Ng
  • Rough Rides

    Denver Sheriff’s deputies, running the 16th Street Mall drunk van, handcuff intoxicated riders then fail to seat belt them securely into the cage. The results: 38 injuries in five years including gashed foreheads, stitches, and broken limbs. In more than half the cases, “braking” was a contributing factor, which raises the possibility the deputies are intentionally hurting the drunks (as payback for cursing, spitting at them etc.)
  • Mixed Signals on Substance Abuse at San Diego State

    Following the repercussions of an undercover police drug raid in 2008, San Diego State crime statistics took an interesting turn. After the peak six years ago, the amount of alcohol-related incidents (DUI, Drunk and Disorderly, MIP, and more) steadily dropped, while the amount of students requiring medical transports for alcohol- or drug-related conditions skyrocketed. Madison Hopkins and Leonardo Castaneda, two editors at San Diego State's independent student newspaper, The Daily Aztec, investigated the reasoning behind this trend and what it meant for students.
  • Dangerous Streets

    Three articles about the way the Philadelphia courts and police as well as the state legislature have contributed to what one judge called “chaos on the street.” Over the course of a year, the reporters looked into the variety of ways that law enforcement has failed to keep the public safe from drivers convicted of drug offenses, repeatedly drunken drivers and drivers with warrants outstanding for their arrest as a result of violations for dangerous driving.