Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "edward snowden" ...

  • Edward Snowden's Guardian Angels

    On June 9, 2013, when Edward Snowden chose Hong Kong as the place where to reveal the massive civil rights abuses by the American intelligence services, he forgot one thing: where to go next. Still, he managed to escape the American agents, the Hong Kong Police and all journalists who were chasing him. This article reveals for the first time how Snowden managed to stay hidden in Hong Kong for two weeks before leaving for Moscow. And it introduces the people who helped him.
  • Into Dangerous Hands

    Scott Pelley uncovers critical lapses in the US security clearance process that millions of people, including NSA leaker Edward Snowden and convicted spy Chelsea Manning, must pass to work with America's secrets.
  • Inside the Mind of Edward Snowden

    The first reporting from NBC News based on Snowden’s documents to be broadcast and published by a U.S. network, was the spark for an exclusive primetime special called “Inside the Mind of Edward Snowden,” hosted by NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams. Snowden said that it was a combination of the Investigative Unit’s work and Williams’ credibility and national audience that led him to agree to the much-sought interview. “Inside the Mind of Edward Snowden” was an extraordinary television moment and an important public service. The hour-long special was the first-ever U.S. TV interview with the exiled intelligence analyst whose disclosures about government surveillance have sparked sweeping changes to U.S. policy and transformed the debate about the balance between personal privacy and national security.
  • The Data Brokers

    The report chronicles the so-called data broker industry, made up of private companies that digitally collect and sell personal information about Americans, largely in secret. We found that while most Americans became concerned about government snooping and the collection of raw data after the Edward Snowden leaks, few had heard about the data broker industry which mines and commodifies sensitive personal information.
  • United States of Secrets

    In the wake of the Edward Snowden NSA revelations, FRONTLINE’s United States of Secrets investigates the history of the American government’s extensive electronic espionage operations, it’s efforts to keep that spying secret, and how the government used American companies to help spy on people around the world.
  • Inside the NSA

    When the National Security Agency’s most secretive programs were first leaked in June by the former contractor Edward Snowden, the Agency was the target of countless reports and at the center of an unprecedented international response. No other U.S. agency had experienced any-thing nearing this level of criticism in recent times. As we constructed it, the N.S.A. was a story about a debate, not a villain, and we added to that debate with important information. We wanted to provide clarity on the technical capabilities of the NSA and to do that we knew we needed to get inside the Agency to see how it operates.
  • NSA and the Snowden files

    For six months, The Washington Post was on the leading edge of reporting on the National Security Agency and the documents leaked by former contractor Edward Snowden. It began by becoming the first news outlet to disclose PRISM, a massive program to vacuum up e-mails, documents and other electronic records from the largest U.S. Internet companies. Later, The Post revealed the NSA’s repeated violations of its own privacy rules; examined the workings of the secretive federal court overseeing surveillance activities; exposed the NSA’s clandestine collection of millions of e-mail address books globally; and broke the news that the agency was gathering nearly 5 billion records a day on the whereabouts of cellphones around the world. The Post shattered the decades-long secrecy surround the intelligence community’s “black budget,” publishing an in-depth story based on the budget summary for fiscal 2013 and disclosing unprecedented details about spending levels in graphics in print and online. At the end of the year, reporter Bart Gellman conducted the first in-person interview with Snowden in Russia.
  • The NSA Files

    In a series of investigative stories based on top-secret National Security Agency (NSA) documents leaked by former intelligence analyst Edward Snowden, the Guardian US revealed the vast scale and scope of domestic and international surveillance programs, the close relationship between technology companies and intelligence agencies, and how technology is leading to widespread, indiscriminate and routine mass collection of telephone and internet data of millions of Americans. Guardian US reporting has shed unprecedented light on inadequate oversight over surveillance activities and how secretive and outdated laws have failed to keep up with changing technology. On June 5, 2013, the Guardian US was the first to reveal a FISA court order showing how “under the Obama administration the communication records of millions of US citizens are being collected indiscriminately and in bulk.” On June 9, in an exclusive video interview and Q&A published at theguardian.com, the source of the leaks revealed himself as Edward Snowden. The Verizon story would be the first of a series of extensive revelations (enclosed for consideration with this entry) that exposed the scale and sophistication of surveillance programs and the secret laws that govern them. The Guardian’s reporting prompted vigorous debate in the US and around the world. The stories have dominated headlines and driven news agendas worldwide. The disclosures exposed misleading statements by senior US administration officials and elicited responses from the highest levels of government -- including The White House, the Office of Director of National Intelligence, Congress and the courts. They prompted numerous legal challenges, Congressional hearings and legislation calling for reform, increased oversight and transparency for NSA programs.