Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "environment" ...

  • Invisible Disaster

    For 16 weeks, the potent climate gas methane poured from a broken natural gas well in Los Angeles County. It would become the largest such accident in U.S. history. It drove thousands of sickened people from their homes, spurred dozen of lawsuits, cost a Fortune 500 company hundreds of millions of dollars and set back California climate efforts.
  • Unsafe at Any Level

    When news broke of the lead water crisis in Flint, Michigan, much of the nation, its political leaders and journalists turned their focus toward this blue collar city an hour’s drive north of Detroit. Reuters journalists M.B. Pell and Joshua Schneyer turned their attention toward the next Flint, searching for communities facing environmental perils that had not yet come to light.
  • Press & Sun-Bulletin (NY) environmental watchdog

    Two deep projects of environmental investigative reporting demonstrating the newsroom's commitment to deeply covering this subject. In each case, the subjects have a major impact on the Southern Tier of New York State. The projects appeared in Binghamton but also were published by our sister papers in the Southern Tier (Elmira Star-Gazette and The Ithaca Journal).
  • Complaint Report

    After a 30-month analysis, a Public Herald investigation into fracking complaints uncovered 9 ways officials at the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) kept drinking water contamination across Pennsylvania “off the books” since 2004.
  • Bottled Water from a National Forest

    The Desert Sun revealed in a series of investigations that the U.S. Forest Service has been allowing Nestle to pipe water out of a national forest to produce bottled water using a permit that lists an expiration date of 1988. The newspaper found that Forest Service officials failed to follow through on plans for an environmental review that would have assessed whether the use of water for bottling is harming sensitive habitat along a creek. The Desert Sun also obtained records showing the agency hasn’t examined the environmental impacts of hundreds of expired permits that allow for the use of water from national forests.
  • Federal Whistleblower Program Fails to Protect

    From airlines to pipelines, they are the workers on the front lines who speak up when systems break down. An NBC Bay Area investigation reveals that the federal program designed to protect whistleblowers who raise red flags about public health, environmental violations and corporate wrongdoing, is failing to meet its mission. Insiders say that puts all of us at risk. http://www.nbcbayarea.com/investigations/Federal-Whistleblower-Investigator-Fired-After-Blowing-the-Whistle-on-His-Own-Agency-332240782.html http://www.nbcbayarea.com/investigations/OSHA-Dismisses-Majority-of-Whistleblower-Cases-Agency-Investigates-332258162.html http://www.nbcbayarea.com/investigations/OSHA-Whistleblower-Investigator-Blows-Whistle-on-Own-Agency--293711041.html
  • Abandoned Mine Pollution

    CBS 5 Investigates found radioactive uranium from abandoned mines, leaking into Phoenix's largest drinking water reservoir. That is just one of the findings from our investigation into the toxins left behind at as many 100,000 abandoned mines across the state of Arizona. We collected soil and water samples from ten different locations and had them tested for heavy metals and radioactive materials. Our investigation is ongoing, but so far has prompted the US Forest Service to clean up one of the sites at a cost of more than $300,000, and prompted the state of Arizona to begin an inventory of old mines, in order to figure out which ones pose the most dangers to the environment and human health. http://www.cbs5az.com/story/30211875/cbs-5-investigates-abandoned-mines-polluting-valleys-water-supply?autostart=true http://www.cbs5az.com/story/30211875/cbs-5-investigates-abandoned-mines-polluting-valleys-water-supply?autostart=true
  • Hazardous Waste Regulation Challenges in California

    Despite a number of organizations overseeing the metal shredding industry, regulators have struggled to be effective in their efforts, possibly jeopardizing environmental and societal health. A deep dive into the Sims Recycling Plant in Silicon Valley uncovered decades of violations and millions of dollars of fines. And the failure to effectively police these plants are hurting local residents: in late 2013, the San Francisco Peninsula was engulfed in noxious black smoke when fires broke out at the facility.
  • Two Degrees

    In the lead-up to the Paris climate talks in December 2015, CNN’s John Sutter led months of coverage on one number -- 2 degrees Celsius -- that is key to the planet’s future. The series looked at the scientific basis for that target, which is regarded as the threshold for “dangerous” climate change and is measured as a temperature increase since the Industrial Revolution. It also explored what happens if we cross that mark and what it really will take to avoid that level of warming. http://www.cnn.com/specials/opinions/two-degrees http://www.cnn.com/interactive/2015/06/opinions/sutter-two-degrees-marshall-islands/
  • The Shale Bargain

    The Shale Bargain uncovered systemic failures on the part of state regulators to enforce environmental, health and safety standards for the multi-billion-dollar drilling industry. http://topics.pennlive.com/tag/the-shale-bargain/