Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "federal investigation" ...

  • Cops and Robbers

    This series charts the path of perhaps the most corrupt officer to wear a Baltimore Police badge, from his history of ignored complaints of abuse and untruthfulness to showing the depths of crimes uncovered by a federal investigation, including drug trafficking and robbery. The story maps out how the corruption was not an isolated event confined to a particular unit, but rather ingrained in the culture of “plainclothes” police units long relied on to combat crime. It exposes new allegations, and educates readers who might otherwise not understand the negative effects of aggressive policing employed in Baltimore’s most high-crime neighborhoods.
  • Silent No More

    “Silent No More” is a one-hour investigative edition of Dateline that we believe is the most in-depth examination to date of institutional failures to protect young athletes from the U.S. Olympic gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar, the sexual predator who molested hundreds of children and young women over decades. The story weaved together original investigative reporting and exclusive interviews with subjects at the very center of the scandal, providing new revelations about the missteps- by the FBI and others- that allowed Nassar to continue to abuse dozens patients for a full year even after he was under federal investigation.
  • PublicSource: Revelations of police technology problems spark FBI scrutiny, alleged retaliation and unfinished work

    For the first time, PublicSource reported how Pittsburgh's reform-minded police chief touched off an FBI investigation into how city employee's handled software contracts. Included were projects that were never implemented by 2018, though they were fully paid for five years earlier using federal funds. The federal investigation ended without any charges, but internal investigations in the city were ongoing. A former officer also claims he faced retaliation for reporting concerns about tech projects, specifically from one of the city's highest ranking public safety officials. He is currently suing the city over several of the same concerns first publicly reported in our stories. Our stories led directly to internal changes in city purchasing and increased scrutiny of purchasing by City Council.
  • inewsource: Hustling Hope

    inewsource spent months investigating how a California lawyer built a national network of Trina Health clinics to perform what he calls a “miraculous” treatment for reversing the complications of diabetes, even though medical experts consider it a scam that harms patients. Senior healthcare reporter Cheryl Clark tells the story of a couple in rural Montana who invested their life savings into opening their own clinic, in part so the husband could get the treatments locally for his diabetes. Less than two years later, the clinic was shuttered as health insurers refused to pay for the treatment and its founder came under federal investigation. He pleaded guilty in January 2019 to public corruption charges related to his Trina Health operation in Alabama.
  • WaPo: EPA chief ’s trips more costly, less publicized

    The Post’s investigation of EPA chief Scott Pruitt exposed serious ethical lapses that sparked several federal investigations — and led to his resignation.
  • Bird-dogging the Buffalo Billion

    Gov. Andrew Cuomo launched the "Buffalo Billion" program in 2012 with the intention of revitalizing the Western New York economy. Investigative Post's reporting documented the extraordinary lengths to which Cuomo administration has gone to withhold disclosure of how the $1 billion is being spent. Our reporting also revealed that lucrative development contracts were awarded to major donors to Cuomo's campaign committee and that SolarCity, the major beneficiary of the state's spending, is losing vast amounts of money and under federal investigation. Subsequent reporting detailed that minority hiring goals for the SolarCity project, involving the construction of a $750 million solar panel manufacturing plant, were lowered and that African Americans made up less than 6 percent of the workforce.
  • Public Corruption in Nassau County

    A federal investigation into New York State Senator Dean Skelos and his son’s job with a firm that had a contract with Nassau County raised the prospect that additional problems with the county contracting process had escaped federal attention. Newsday assigned four reporters to determine whether the expenditure of tax dollars had been corrupted, and over the course of the year, the newspaper published parallel investigations that have led to local and federal investigations, an impact on local elections and important questions about how the county’s top officials conduct public business.
  • INVISIBLE WOUNDS

    KARE 11’s yearlong investigation documented how the Department of Veterans Affairs was using unqualified doctors and inadequate tests to improperly deny benefits – and access to medical care – promised to the nation’s veterans. Our groundbreaking reports prompted official federal investigations and helped spur reforms nationwide. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLi0111Ywj0
  • Dissecting a Bad Deal

    A Wisconsin State Journal investigation uncovered potential waste, fraud and corruption connected to a questionable state taxpayer loan to a struggling Milwaukee business owner. The investigation found Gov. Scott Walker's top cabinet secretary pushed for a loan to the business owner, a top Walker donor, who presented false information to the Wisconsin Economic Development Corp., which hastily bypassed the usual review process. It also found the business owner potentially committed fraud and illegally solicited campaign donations from employees. The story resulted in several changes to the agency, including the scrapping of its loan program, calls for a federal investigation and bipartisan legislation creating criminal penalties for defrauding the agency.
  • Chris Christie, White House Ambitions and the Abuse of Power

    Chris Christie, White House Ambitions and the Abuse of Power is a series of reports on the exercise of power by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and his administration. The stories investigate his administration’s use of the busiest bridge in the world to take political revenge on a small-town mayor; the operation of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for the political and financial benefit of his administration and his friends and donors; and the use of federal Sandy aid to strong arm the mayor of Hoboken. These reports focused national attention on a leading Republican candidate in the 2016 presidential race. Plus, they established the narrative both for national and local coverage and for state and federal investigations of the administration. Most important, WNYC uncovered key information about the politicization of public entities by an elected official whose appeal to voters is based on the perception that he is above politics. Our submission for review by the IRE includes our most significant work on this story. Our reporting resulted in the forced resignation of Gov. Christie’s top man at the Port Authority, a bi-state agency that controls $8 billion in annual revenue raised largely from tolls and fares paid by commuters of this region. In addition, WNYC’s in-depth reports on the Port Authority prompted criminal investigations by the Manhattan District Attorney and the Securities and Exchange Commission into the misuse of Port Authority funds. It led the United States Attorney for New Jersey to widen its investigation into conflicts of interest by David Samson, the Port Authority Chair, and a close Christie ally. And the reporting has spurred the creation of a bi-state panel to reform the Port Authority, as well as reform measures in the New Jersey and New York Legislatures.