Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "flint" ...

  • Lead Kids

    Decades before there was lead in drinking water in Flint, Michigan that poisoned kids, there was lead paint in homes. Some of those victims received life-time payouts for their injuries from landlords who failed to clean up the problem. And now some of those same lead kids, are being enticed to sell that future cash stream for pennies on the dollar. As a result of this investigation, CBS News found that some of the lead paint victims were defrauded by unscrupulous companies looking to make a profit. In their reporting, they found that these lead paint victims, as adults, had limited capacity to understand what they were signing away because of the irreversible brain damage caused by exposure to lead paint as kids.
  • Unsafe at Any Level

    When news broke of the lead water crisis in Flint, Michigan, much of the nation, its political leaders and journalists turned their focus toward this blue collar city an hour’s drive north of Detroit. Reuters journalists M.B. Pell and Joshua Schneyer turned their attention toward the next Flint, searching for communities facing environmental perils that had not yet come to light.
  • ACLU of Michigan: Flint Water Crisis

    This nomination is made by Kary Moss, Executive Director of the ACLU of Michigan, for work performed by the ACLU of Michigan’s Investigative Reporter, Curt Guyette. Curt’s work was pivotal in exposing the disastrous results of the State of Michigan’s decision to take the City of Flint off of the Detroit Water system and instead use the Flint River. At the time, the City was under the control of state-appointed emergency managers who had made the decision to switch the source of the City’s water as a cost-cutting measure. Two years ago the ACLU of Michigan created a new position of investigative report to examine and report on the repercussions of the State of Michigan’s use of a law that allowed it put an emergency manager in control of the city’s finances, divesting locally elected authorities of their powers. ACLU of Michigan legal staff provided additional help in filing Freedom of Information Act requests and helping Curt gain access to State of Michigan press briefings.
  • "The Climate Change Lobby"

    Multinational lobbyists, particularly business interests in fossil fuel energy production, have backlashed against government's expanded interest in deterring climate change. As decisive action on global warming increasingly takes center stage, the climate change lobby over the past six years has increased in numbers by 400 percent. "The Climate Change Lobby" explores how special interests have attempted to sway environmental policy in a time of important decisions on global environmental and economic sustainability.
  • From senate job to nuclear lobbyist-- twice

    "This story traced how Alex Flint, a protégé of unabashed nuclear industry booster Senator Pete Domenici, parlayed his post as clerk of Domenici's powerful appropriations subcommittee into a lucrative lobbying job for the nuclear power industry. When Domenici ascended to the chairmanship of the Senate's Energy Committee, he lured Flint back at about one-third his lobbyist's salary to spend three years pushing the Energy Policy Act of 2005 through Congress." Afterwards, Flint was "rewarded with the nuclear industry's top lobbying job."
  • WNEM 5 Investigates Flint Veterinarian

    WNEM-TV investigates a veterinarian, Dr. Lloyd Nelki, who allegedly abused and killed pets, "charged clients for services he didn't perform ... and forced employees to perform procedures they were not qualified to do." The report reveals that in recent years hundreds of animals have suffered from the doctor, who still continues his practice, while a state investigation is underway.
  • WNEM Investigates Flint 9-1-1

    A WNEM-TV investigation reveals that the lateness of a 9-1-1 emergency call center has led to a homicide. The report details how "16-year-old Gowan Younger called for help when his uncle attacked him with a knife." The 9-1-1 tapes, obtained by WNEM-TV, have proved that the emergency center staff were late helping and the teen shot his uncle when he attacked him again. The story has resulted in dismissing the charges against the teen.
  • WNEM 5 Investigates Flint Air Show

    A WNEM-TV series reveals how a man with fake credentials, William "Mickey" Traylor, has "raised thousands of dollars" through "an air show for underprivileged kids." The stories depict a fraud scheme, in which "nobody knows where the money went, because everything for the air show is donated." The investigation finds that Traylor has lied about being a retired military pilot and a former employee of Southwest Airlines, and the local airport management has failed to check his background.
  • Playing With Fire

    A WNEM-TV series "looks at the hidden epidemic of juvenile firesetters, focusing first on a teenager caught in the compulsion to burn." It also details the story of "a grieving father [who] shows how a fascination with fire can lead to crime." The investigation reveals that "one reason why urban areas like Flint and Saginaw might fall prey to arsonists so easily is because there are so many abandoned buildings."
  • WNEM 5 Investigates: University Park

    A WNEM-TV investigation reveals that a new subdivision of the City of Flint, MI, has been built on contaminated land. "The main contaminate in the soil naturally occurring arsenic, but it also could have contained Xylene." The story details how the city officials and the developers have guarded the secret for three years and have failed to inform the buyers and "contractors who were working in the dirt, including city employees." The reporters expose the lack of state laws requiring developers of new homes to disclose any potential problems.The investigation reveals that the state has warned the City of Flint not to use the soil as fill dirt, but the warning has been neglected. "...The contaminated soil has been trucked from here [Flint city] to countless other states ...".