Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "foreign affairs" ...

  • Trump & Ukraine: Fact and Fiction

    The President’s men, the Vice President’s son and a single phone call: the real story of what happened in Ukraine and why it led to impeachment hearings. As the rumors and accusations surrounding President Trump’s involvement in Ukraine started to swirl, NBC’s Chief Foreign Correspondent Richard Engel travelled to Ukraine to talk to the key players on the ground to tell the story of why the Ukrainian prosecutor investigating Joe Biden’s son was really fired. Engel and his team in Ukraine secured the first broadcast interview with the man central to the story – the Ukrainian former Prosecutor Yuri Leshenko. He revealed that President Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani was applying pressure for an investigation to be reopened, in an apparent attempt to dig for dirt on a political rival. He told NBC exclusively that far from being a one-off conversation, the two had spoken “around ten times”. This information was picked up and widely reported by other media.
  • Pentagon secretly struck back against Iranian cyberspies targeting U.S. ships

    In the middle of June, tensions were rising between the United States and Iran. Iran had attacked oil tankers traveling through the Strait of Hormuz, and then downed an expensive, high-tech Navy RQ-4 Global Hawk surveillance drone flying over the Strait, upping the ante of the conflict. Given previous rhetoric from Trump administration officials including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo against the Iranian regime, the decision to exit the Iran deal or the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, and the increasingly heavy sanctions on Iran, the Yahoo News team was monitoring for chances to report in more depth on specific Iranian capabilities as well as U.S. plans to counter them. Following the attack on the U.S. drone, Yahoo News began communicating with sources who had extensive detail on a specific unit within the Iranian military in the cross-hairs of the U.S. military, a unit that had advanced its cyber capabilities to the point that it was able to track nearly all ships traveling through the Strait through both social engineering, or pretending to be attractive women engaging with service members traveling on the ships, to actually compromising ship GPS data websites in order to digitally monitor their paths. In the course of reporting, Yahoo News discovered a key, news breaking event—that just hours prior, the U.S. Cyber Command had launched a retaliatory strike aimed at limiting the capabilities of the specific Iranian cyber group the team had already been investigating. Yahoo was the first to break the news of the retaliatory strike, leading dozens of major news outlets to race to match the story. However, given the fact Yahoo News was investigating details into the cyber unit, our story was not only first but best and most detailed. The story demonstrates our ability to jump into the news cycle, provide key breaking news to our readers, as well as dig deep into illuminating new details. The story also revealed that Iranian capabilities to intercept and down drones to study them for espionage purposes was highly advanced, a fact previously unknown. Given President Trump’s recent decision to authorize a strike to kill IRGC Commander Qasem Suleimani, our reporting will continue to provide value to readers, analysts, and other interested parties hoping to better understand Iranian capabilities and how the U.S. might respond to them.
  • McClatchy: Trump Fundraiser Foreign Ties

    Amid intense media scrutiny last year of the Trump administration's ties to foreign countries, McClatchy’s Washington Bureau was the first news outlet to report on how a top fundraiser for Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign and the Republican National Committee offered foreign politicians access to the Trump administration in the hopes of winning business from their countries. McClatchy’s initial report led the pack on months-worth of reporting by a number of outlets on Broidy's foreign efforts that ultimately contributed to his resignation from the RNC.
  • Hunting Boko Haram

    FRONTLINE investigates Nigeria's efforts to "Bring Back Our Girls" and fight Boko Haram.
  • Cuba Twitter

    To the annals of American subterfuge in Fidel and Raul Castro’s Cuba, The Associated Press revealed a new and astonishing case: the curious story of a fake “Cuban Twitter.” The idea was to create a cellphone text messaging service to provoke unrest and undermine Cuba’s communist government. It was hatched in 2010 by the U.S. Agency for International Development, an agency best known for distributing billions of dollars in humanitarian aid. This package not only details the "Cuban Twitter" program, but describes other covert operations run out of USAID over the past year.
  • Sexual-Harassment Cases Plaque U.N.

    This investigation digs into how the United Nations (U.N.) handles internal sexual harassment complaints. The current system for handling complaints is arbitrary, unfair and delays bureaucracy. Many cases take years to judge, accusers either retire or resign, which leaves them out of reach of the U.N. justice system. Overall, “no matter which way the cases go, they mishandle it.”
  • Exposed: The Toxic Chemistry of Everyday Products and What's at Stake for American Power

    This book investigates the response by U.S. companies and the U.S. government to the raising of environmental health standards by the European Union. The book reveals the Bush Administration's policy of retreating from environmental responsibility, while the rest of the world embraces it. The book explores the effects of this attitude on the environment, health of U.S. citizens and international relations.
  • Plan of Attack: The Secret Strategy Against the Terrorists

    This story looks at the Pentagon's first comprehensive written plan for the war on terrorism, adopted in March 2005. It details the debates that finally produced the plan, and describes its contents.
  • US Oil Politics in the Kuwait of Africa

    Equatorial Guinea has a history of human rights abuses and went so far as to threaten the US Ambassador to the country with death in 1996. Shortly after this incident, diplomatic ties were cut off with the country. Six years later the Bush Administration resumed those connections due to the possibility of 1 billion barrels of oil existing off the coast of the country.
  • Phillips in Africa: Coltan (Colombite Tantalite); Zimbabwe business grab

    CBS News reports on the Congo civil war. The first part of the investigation finds that the efforts to stop the war have failed, "in part because Western companies are helping pay for it." Coltan, a mineral essential for the production of computer chips and high-tech devices, has kept the war going because African governments, middlemen and rebels have become "interested in loot as much as politics." The second segment reports on a land dispute in Zimbabwe, which has caused racial conflicts. The threats to white farmers and business-owners have forced some of them to try to escape to South Africa.