Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "foster homes" ...

  • Home Sweet Hustle

    For 15 years, the Portland nonprofit Give Us This Day occupied a unique place among foster-care agencies in the state of Oregon. Its four group homes served the most troubled, challenging kids in the state—children who had been sexually abused, starved, beaten and abandoned. It was the state’s only African-American-run foster care agency, a distinction that made it especially valuable to the state agency that manages housing for foster children, the Oregon Department of Human Services. The executive director of Give Us This Day, Mary Holden, was lauded as a human-rights champion. Give Us This Day was also unique in how leniently it was regulated by state officials. The state turned a blind eye to more than 1,000 police reports at foster homes run by Give Us This Day. It regularly paid large cash advances to the provider—something no other foster-care agency requested so regularly. And the Department of Human Services ignored years of allegations that Give Us This Day neglected children.
  • Children in Danger/Foster Care Crisis

    Boston Herald's months-long investigation into the foster care system in Massachusetts, uncovering disturbing cases of abuse swept under the rug, hundreds of convicts living in foster homes and unlicensed social workers — among other findings — in a series that gained widespread attention and became one of the centerpieces of debate ahead of November's gubernatorial election.
  • Adoption Subsidy

    Because of a confusing tangle of bureaucratic rules, adoptive parents in New York City continue to receive monthly government subsidies even after sending their adopted children back to foster care or kicking them out onto the street. The subsidy is meant to encourage parents to adopt "hard-to-place" children out of foster care and to provide for the children’s care. But in the event that an adoption does not work out, the city’s children services agency will not cut off the subsidy even when it learns that the parents are no longer caring for their kids, blaming restrictive state and federal rules for its inability to act. This means, as one NYC Family Court judge said, that a child in foster care “would not have enough money for a winter coat while their parents were getting a thousand dollars a month from the city.” The city’s refusal to act also means the government is in many cases double-paying for the children’s care: one set of payments going to the children’s new foster homes and another set going to the parents who have turned their backs on them.
  • In the Background: a KCRA-3 Investigation

    KCRA-3 found that the state of California was clearing people with arrests for child molestation, sex abuse of a minor, elder abuse, arson, even murder to work in daycares, elder care facilities, nursing homes and foster homes. The state would clear people to work who had multiple arrests and then investigate later. Yet those investigations took months, sometimes years to complete. As a result of our investigation the department changed their policy and a new state law was signed that would prevent the department from changing their policy back. No longer are people with arrests for violent crimes simply cleared to work and then checked later.
  • Failure to Protect

    The two-day series “A Failure to Protect” examined what went wrong in the case of a Central Minnesota family that grew to 26 through a mix of biological, adopted and foster children, but eventually was torn apart by sexual abuse charges. Reporters David Unze and Kirsti Marohn uncovered how Minnesota’s child protection system allows either counties or nonprofits to license foster homes with little oversight.
  • Failure to Protect; Cries for Help

    In this 16 month series, WTHR looks at the working of the child welfare system in Indiana. The reports showed how the sate was not protecting children it had placed in foster homes. In some cases children died due to being ill-treated or neglect in the foster homes. After this series was aired, the state government passed a law making prior death records of children in foster care public.
  • Fostering Frustration

    This story about foster children is a three part series. Reporters found that children in foster homes in the suburbs of Chicago moved from one foster home to another at a rate that was higher than their counterparts in other parts of the city as well as the state average. This story looks at the foster care system from the eyes of the children.
  • Foster Care Cash Flow

    copy of story #21124
  • Failure to protect

    This series reveals cases of neglect and abuse in state-sanctioned foster homes and that Indiana has crossed the federally allowable limit for such cases. Exposing dangerous conditions to which the children were subject, the series highlights particular instances of malnourishment and sexual assualt that have proved fatal. Finally, the stories raises questions about confidentiality rules adopted by these foster homes.
  • In A Child's Best Interest

    MSNBC reports on child welfare hearings in three Indiana juvenile courts. "Specifically, these hearings involve children who are the victims of abuse, neglect, or at-risk situations. The program focuses on one of the more desperate corners of modern life and penetrates the world of the juvenile justice system, which, by law, is closed to the public and media. Our cameras expose stories of sexual abuse and capture how the courts handle these young victims. We also reveal excruciating, personal experiences as children are placed in residential treatment facilities. Lastly, we document the incompetence of a state child welfare system that allowed a teenage girl to go through two-dozen foster homes during her 14 years in the system."