Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "global warming" ...

  • Bitten: The Secret History of Lyme Disease and Biological Weapons

    The first reported cases of Lyme disease surfaced in 1968; a half century later, CDC scientists believe there could be more than 300,000 new cases in the US every year. As this and other debilitating tick-borne diseases continue to spread, their origins have remained elusive. Some believe global warming is fueling the epidemic, others attribute it to human migration. But the fundamental question persists: where did Lyme disease come from? This mystery prompted Stanford University science writer and Lyme disease survivor Kris Newby to launch an investigation that led her to startling discoveries linking the outbreak to America’s clandestine biological warfare program. In BITTEN: The Secret History of Lyme Disease and Biological Weapons (Harper Wave; May 14, 2019; ISBN: 978-006-289-6278; 352 pages; $26.99)—a riveting work of scientific reportage and biography that reads like a thriller—Newby reveals the story of Willy Burgdorfer, the man who discovered the microbe behind the disease, and his role in covering up evidence that could implicate another tick- borne organisms in the original outbreak.
  • Carbon Wars

    Climate change can seem abstract and overwhelming. Pollution, likewise, can seem intractable. In fact, macro subjects like these can be brought down to ground level, as evidenced by "Carbon Wars," an unsparing look at the fossil-fuel industry with the aim of accountability — calling out companies that poison our air and water and feed global warming, and regulators and politicians who can’t or won’t do their jobs.
  • Big Oil and Climate Change

    Even as major oil companies were publicly casting doubt on climate change science, they were quietly taking steps to protect their businesses from its effects.
  • Exxon: The Road Not Taken

    Our investigation reveals an early, little-known chapter in Exxon's history, when the company conducted rigorous climate change research from the late 1970s to mid-1980s. Not only did Exxon accept the reality of global warming, its scientists and executives recognized the risk global warming posed to the planet and to its core business. This posture toward climate change contrasts sharply with the company's role as a leader, funder and architect of climate disinformation in subsequent decades.
  • 'Climate Change' Ban

    In Florida, state employees and scientists aren’t allowed to use the term “climate change” and “global warming.” This outrageous fact, revealed by the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting in 2015, underpins a probing series of government accountability stories we believe are worthy of your consideration.
  • Windfall

    "Windfall" talks about how some organizations benefits and take advantage of global warming awareness to grow their business.
  • Deep Inside the Wild World of China’s Fracking Boom

    Mother Jones' Jaeah Lee and Climate Desk's James West traveled to central China and uncovered alarming trends with global consequences. The duo reveals how as China, as it aims to wean itself from coal, has called on multinational oil and gas giants to help tap into its vast natural gas resources. As fracking technology crosses over from the fields of Pennsylvania to the mountains of Sichuan, so have questions about its risks and consequences. The practice, which has been linked to contaminated water, methane leaks, and earthquakes in the United States, may pose greater risks in China, given what one expert describes as a "pollute first, clean up later" mentality. Their yearlong investigation includes a five-part video series complete with data visualizations and charts, expert and insider perspectives, and rich, on-the-ground documentary footage.
  • Meltdown: Terror at the Top of the World

    This is a different type of investigative story. I followed the process I would have used for a traditional investigative piece—digging through complex reports, cultivating sources, deciphering data, reconciling opposing ideas. But instead of trying to uncover wrongdoing, my goal was to introduce a wide audience to a complex and divisive topic that is typically understood and discussed only by insiders: climate change.
  • Our Year of Extremes: Did Climate Change Just Hit Home?

    Our Year of Extremes: Did Climate Change Just Hit Home? with Ann Curry is the first serious hour-long US network primetime special to report the facts about climate change: that there is virtually no debate among climate scientists that climate change is real, is here now, and is largely caused by human activity.
  • Green, Not So Green

    The AP spent 11 months examining the hidden environmental costs of the nation’s green-energy boom: undisclosed eagle deaths at wind farms; untracked loss of conservation lands and native prairies created by the ethanol mandate; and the government’s unadvertised support of more oil drilling with money to clean up coal-fired power plants. All energy has costs, and in the case of fossil fuels those costs have been well documented. But when it comes to green energy, the administration, the industry, and environmentalists don’t want to talk about. The AP series shows how the Obama administration has at times looked the other way and in other cases made environmental concessions for so-called green energy to make headway in its fight against global warming.