Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "housing" ...

  • The Impact After the CHA Plan for Transformation

    Data from U.S. Housing & Urban Development, the Chicago Housing Authority and the U.S. Census Bureau was analyzed by census tract in the city of Chicago and by municipality in the six-county suburban area for the years 2000 and 2015. In 1999, Mayor Richard M. Daley boldly promised to transform public housing in Chicago — in part by tearing down the high-rise housing projects that lined the city’s expressways and surrounded the Loop. Today, nearly every Chicago neighborhood — and almost every suburb — has felt the impact of the Chicago Housing Authority’s “Plan for Transformation,” a Better Government Association and Chicago Sun-Times analysis has found. https://cst.carto.com/viz/2a5170a2-2ec4-11e6-93e7-0ecd1babdde5/public_map https://cst.carto.com/viz/c1072cca-3438-11e6-bce7-0e31c9be1b51/public_map
  • Sea Level Rise

    The Bay Area's current waterfront building frenzy includes at least $21 billion in housing and commercial construction in low-lying areas that climate scientists say could flood by the end of the century. In examining approval processes for new buildings on the edge of San Francisco Bay, our team found that some cities are greenlighting waterfront development without planning for the long term or fully accounting for the future costs of reconfiguring large projects to resist flooding.
  • Home Sweet Hustle

    For 15 years, the Portland nonprofit Give Us This Day occupied a unique place among foster-care agencies in the state of Oregon. Its four group homes served the most troubled, challenging kids in the state—children who had been sexually abused, starved, beaten and abandoned. It was the state’s only African-American-run foster care agency, a distinction that made it especially valuable to the state agency that manages housing for foster children, the Oregon Department of Human Services. The executive director of Give Us This Day, Mary Holden, was lauded as a human-rights champion. Give Us This Day was also unique in how leniently it was regulated by state officials. The state turned a blind eye to more than 1,000 police reports at foster homes run by Give Us This Day. It regularly paid large cash advances to the provider—something no other foster-care agency requested so regularly. And the Department of Human Services ignored years of allegations that Give Us This Day neglected children.
  • How Cash Sent the Portland Housing Market Spinning

    Cash is king in red-hot Portland real estate, representing a full one-third of single-family home sales in 2014. Lee van der Voo’s seven-part series on the Portland housing market has uncovered in stark outline the often-obscured influence of cash from developers, foreign buyers and Wall Street in driving affordable housing from the city. Twenty-six investors who purchased more than 10 homes for cash in the listed market in Multnomah County through the recession. Average Black and Native American households priced out of the city. A publicly traded company that is renting out more than 200 Portland-area homes in a new twist on the asset-securitization that drove the Great Recession. The pension funds of teachers and police officers invested in cash-rich Wall Street landlords who compete on the housing market with the very middle-class professionals whose pensions they hold. With van der Voo’s reporting, an economic crisis that everyone in town talked about but no one could explain was given names, faces and numbers — and a hope of being fixed.
  • Dirty Little Secrets: New Jersey’s Poorest Live Surrounded by Contamination

    WNYC found 89 percent of New Jerseyans live within a mile of a contaminated site. Most of those sites are in the process of being cleaned up, which can take years. But our investigation found 1,464 of the state’s 14,066 known contaminated sites don’t have any clean-up plan in place. Many sites have sat orphaned and polluted for years, and they are disproportionately found in low-income communities. http://www.wnyc.org/story/nj-contaminated-sites/
  • Haaretz Investigation: Israeli Corporations Gave Millions to West Bank Settlements

    In this investigative project, Blau looks into how tax-exempt dollars raised in the U.S. end up sustaining illegal Jewish settlements in the West Bank—in direct contravention of longstanding U.S. policy. He systematically analyzed the financial files and tax filings of dozens of American non-profits and their partners in Israel. In an on-going series of stories published by Haaretz, Blau reported that these U.S.-based groups funneled more than $220 million to Jewish settlements during the five-year period between 2009-2013. He found that the money is being spent on everything from new air conditioning units in settlement housing to support payments for the families of convicted Jewish terrorists. By painstakingly tracing, documenting and reporting on the fund-raising and spending of these groups, Blau’s project sheds new light on America's complicated relationship with one of its closest allies. It has stirred heated debate and thoughtful discussion in this country and Israel, including a prominent mention in The New York Times editorial pages and an op-ed (written by Blau) in The Washington Post. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVmWgzpAXX0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0XGsd1LreCY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JyQ9xBbDbrw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACKIAMMK0OY
  • The Buyout of America

    The expose reveals how private equity firms make fortunes by destroying businesses. This is an important topic since secretive PE firms using the same cheap credit that caused the housing bubble bought companies last decade that employed one of every 10 Americans.
  • Condo Takeover

    This “Condo Takeover” series looks at what happened to Florida condos after the real estate crash in 2008-9. [https://ajam.app.box.com/s/ndmvyhiqu6qzylupzhecfgp7vexuxr7o] [https://ajam.app.box.com/s/2m9j7cn06gh3fr18q2mjoqyqiraskhcx]
  • No Place to Call Home

    For low-income residents in Portland, Section 8 has historically been the golden ticket for housing, allowing them to live in market-rate homes instead of housing projects or on the street. But Portland's booming rental market makes it nearly impossible for people with Section 8 to find a home that fits within the criteria set by the program. No Place to Call Home examines the problems with the Section 8 program in Multnomah County and introduces readers to one disabled senior with Section 8 who's facing homelessness – and fighting back.
  • Downtown Reno blight

    Downtown Reno, Nev. was devastated by the recession and though the recession is considered over, much of the city's core remains vacant and blighted. A three-part series - preview video, call to action and investigative piece - published throughout a week in November addressing the issue of downtown blight. http://www.rgj.com/videos/news/2015/11/16/75602720/ http://www.rgj.com/story/news/2015/11/19/why-so-long-clean-up-downtown-reno-blight/75627500/ http://www.rgj.com/story/news/2015/11/17/how-fight-blight-reno/74288332/