Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "illegal immigrants" ...

  • CBS Sunday Morning Investigates Over the Line: Fighting Corruption on our Border

    Over the Line: Fighting Corruption on our Border investigated the conduct of government officials when it comes to the porous Mexico-U.S. border. The FBI reports the border has become a possible pathway for foreign terrorists to easily reach U.S. soil. We examined the risk through the eyes of longtime rancher John Ladd, whose family has owned 14,000 acres in Arizona for generations. He’s watched as a stunning half million illegal immigrants have been captured on his property and says many more have gotten away from Customs and Border Protection agents, who sometimes act suspiciously unconcerned. We intensely mined the FBI for information and convinced the agency to give us unprecedented, exclusive access to some of its case files and methods to tell some of the shocking stories of trusted border agents on the take.The lure of money from criminals who can pay is all too tempting for some of America’s 60,000 border agents. The terrorism-related consequences are nothing short of chilling and potentially impact everyone who lives in the U.S.
  • Investigating the IRS

    As the national deficit soared, WTHR exposed fraud, confusion and government mismanagement that resulted in illegal immigrants getting billions of dollars in improper tax credits and refunds from the Internal Revenue Service. WTHR gained unparalleled access to tax records and immigrant communities to show exactly how the fraud was committed. The investigation revealed the IRS had known about the widespread problems for a decade but failed to act, and that IRS managers actively encouraged their tax examiners to ignore blatant signs of fraud. WTHR’s investigation quickly gained national attention, attracted more than 9 million online views, sparked intense debate and action by Congress, and triggered immediate reforms by the IRS. Following a series of in-depth follow-ups by WTHR and an Inspector General audit that confirmed all of WTHR’s findings, the IRS announced final rule changes in December designed to reduce the massive fraud and to save taxpayers billions of dollars.
  • Justice in the Shadows

    Although immigration is one of America’s most divisive, visceral, and hotly debated issues, the public rarely gets a close look at the vast law enforcement network that every year detains more than 400,000 suspected illegal immigrants. Courts often operate inside prisons, far from view. Immigration officials play by rules that would not be permitted for the police or the FBI. Here is a system heavily shielded from public scrutiny. Reporting even routine activities is a challenge. Boston Globe reporters Maria Sacchetti and Milton J. Valencia, however, penetrated the wall of secrecy. Their three-part series, “Justice in the Shadows,” revealed a dysfunctional and largely unaccountable system that locks up people who pose little threat while releasing dangerous criminals back to US streets because their home countries won’t take them back. The results, Sacchetti and Valencia showed, at times can be deadly for Americans and foreigners alike. The reporting was anything but quick or easy. Sacchetti and Valencia filed more than 20 Freedom of Information Act requests to federal agencies that comprise the immigration system. Nearly all of them were partially or wholly denied, purportedly to protect the privacy of the immigrants. With the federal government blocking the way, Sacchetti and Valencia found other avenues to document what was happening inside this Byzantine system, investing a year to do so. The effort to shed light on the immigration system continues: The Globe has filed a federal lawsuit against the Department of Homeland Security to force the agency to reveal the names of more than 8,000 criminal foreigners released in the US because they couldn’t be deported.
  • Investigating the IRS

    As the national deficit soared, WTHR exposed fraud, confusion and government mismanagement that resulted in illegal immigrants getting billions of dollars in improper tax credits and refunds from the Internal Revenue Service. WTHR gained unparalleled access to tax records and immigrant communities to show exactly how the fraud was committed. The investigation revealed the IRS had known about the widespread problems for a decade but failed to act, and that IRS managers actively encouraged their tax examiners to ignore blatant signs of fraud. WTHR’s investigation quickly gained national attention, attracted more than 9 million online views, sparked intense debate and action by Congress, and triggered immediate reforms by the IRS. Following a series of in-depth follow-ups by WTHR and an Inspector General audit that confirmed all of WTHR’s findings, the IRS announced final rule changes in December designed to reduce the massive fraud and to save taxpayers billions of dollars.
  • Immigrants and the California Economy

    This in-depth review of immigrant labor in California shows that the government has broken its promise to keep illegal immigrants from obtaining work. The chances of an illegal immigrant being arrested are extremely low -- 1,300 to 1.
  • Road to Nowhere:The men who are caught transporting illegal immigrants rarely pay the price

    A Colorado law passed to prohibit human smuggling has proven to be difficult to enforce. Most charges against human smugglers are dismissed or don't end up in court.
  • Car seizures at DUI checkpoints prove profitable for cities, raise legal questions

    California law enforcement officials running sobriety checkpoints are more likely to seize cars from unlicensed sober drivers than from drunk drivers. Most of the drivers losing their cars are illegal immigrants.
  • Fields of Terror-The New Slave Trade in the Heart of Europe

    People from poor countries are becoming modern day slaves as they are lured in on false pretenses and then being held captive. They were promised “good salaries, accommodations, and food”, but instead were beaten and threatened if they asked for these items. These people were becoming slaves and provided many local restaurants with fresh foods from the surrounding fields. Even though this was all happening, many people were continuing to get away with having these modern day slaves and no one was stopping them.
  • Are Your Papers in Order

    The series reveals how the Sheriff of Maricopa County rounded up illegal aliens for deportation in an effort to remove illegal immigrants. The way this was done was arresting many people without probable cause and simple issues, such as traffic stops. Further, he was stopping darker colored people with alleged infractions and later checking on their residency to determine if they had to be deported or not.
  • Deported: Until we meet again

    For many Ohio jails and retention offices, illegal immigrants can mean big bucks. Contracts with Immigration and Customs Enforcement could allow some sheriff departments to create revenue by keeping immigrants who are waiting to be deported. Many deportees who are eventually deported say they will come back to the U.S.