Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "internal affairs" ...

  • Tarnished Brass

    In the name of protecting men and women in uniform, states across the country have made it nearly impossible to identify dangerous law enforcement officers with a track record of violence and other misdeeds. Records detailing their misconduct often are filed away, rarely seen by anyone outside of the department. Police unions and their political allies have worked to put special protections in place ensuring some records are shielded from public view, or even destroyed. A national tracking system for backgrounding officers is incomplete and not available to the public. More than two years ago, USA TODAY and its network of newsrooms across the nation set out to change that. More than two dozen reporters began collecting public records from the communities they covered and beyond. Also contributing substantially to the record-gathering was the Invisible Institute, a nonprofit journalism organization in Chicago that focuses on issues around policing tactics and criminal justice. We pieced together lists of decertified officers in more than 40 states. We collected logs and paper records related to 110,000 internal affairs investigations. We gathered information on 14,000 lawsuits against departments and fought to obtain so-called Brady lists, documenting officers flagged for lying and other misdeeds. Then we scoured story archives from our newsrooms and others to piece together the most comprehensive list of police misconduct cases ever built.
  • Protecting the Shield

    “Protecting the Shield” exposed the deaths and injuries caused by out-of-control rogue cops who are knowingly left on the streets by their superiors. This exhaustive indictment of government failings shows how weak police oversight cost citizens their lives, honest officers their careers and taxpayers tens of millions of dollars. Our work prompted police reforms, including random drug testing of all police officers and a statewide internal affairs overhaul.
  • Suspect shootings

    After a series of fatal shootings by Philadelphia police that violated department regulations, The Inquirer began closely examining all big-dollar settlements of civil rights lawsuits to determine what went wrong. Reporters found officers persisted in shooting at moving vehicles, often with deadly results. They also uncovered patterns of shoddy investigations by police Internal Affairs investigators and by criminal prosecutors, typically acting with no public accountability.
  • Focus on Force

    An Orlando Sentinel investigation found that the Orlando Police Department used force against suspects far more often than other departments of similar size; that a small number of officers accounted for an outsize proportion of the use of force; that the department’s internal-affairs division never investigated officer violence that resulted in the city’s paying more than $1 million to settle excessive-force claims; and that the city’s downtown core accounted for one in every three instances of force used by officers against suspects.
  • Ticket-Rigging Traffic Enforcement

    The KHOU I-Team discovered how a group of officers in Houston Police Department’s elite Traffic Enforcement Division listed each other on speeding tickets when they were never there--all to later collect more overtime when they appeared in court. In case after case, records showed an officer was writing a ticket at one location, but at the exact same time on the exact same day, he was listed as a “witnessing officer” on a ticket at a completely different location, miles away. One of the targets of the ticket-rigging scheme committed suicide after learning he was under investigation by the Houston Police Internal Affairs Division. The Houston City Prosecutor's office dismissed more than six thousand tickets by the officers in question "in the interest of justice."
  • Excessive Force

    A woman claimed a Huntsville Police officer’s excessive force caused her to lose her unborn baby. WAFF 48 obtained video of the traffic stop and also requested the outcome of the internal affairs investigation, along with the officer’s history with the department. Huntsville Police denied the requests until we brought in legal council. After WAFF 48's attorneys got involved, Huntsville Police provided the officer’s employment history which included multiple reprimands.
  • Police Misconduct on Long Island hidden by secrecy law and weak oversight

    A nine-month Newsday investigation found that Long Island law enforcement agencies have breached the trust of the citizens they are paid to protect by using New York State’s officer privacy law to hide egregious cases of police misconduct, ranging from falsifying reports and lying to shooting innocent people. Newsday obtained and published portions of previously secret internal affairs investigations, confidential deadly force investigative reports and more than 6 hours of recorded Internal Affairs interviews. The paper’s effort revealed dozens of previously secret misconduct cases and informed the public of the law that helps keep those records hidden from inspection. Without Newsday, the public might never have learned the scope and breadth of offenses being committed in secret by the officers sworn to protect them.
  • Criminalizing Cartoons

    The investigation exposes a police chief's desperate attempt to acquire the name of an anonymous cartoonist, mocking his department on the Internet. A person going by the moniker MrFiddlesticks (and other names) was airing internal affairs dirty laundry in the form of parody. To find out who, the city prosecutor, police chief and a local judge teamed up to craft a criminal search warrant. KIRO-TV's investigative unit not only uncovered questionable legal tactics (like prosecutor shopping), but later caught police shredding hundreds of records related the case. First Amendment and FOIA issues are central to this ongoing investigation.
  • "Fresno Cops Involved in Repeat Shootings Still on Duty"

    This investigative report by Ali Winston found that "27 Fresno police officers were involved in repeat shootings of civilians" from 2003 to 2009. Winston compared the data to the Oakland Police Department, a city that has a higher crime rate, during the same period of time and found that "only five officers were involved in repeat shootings." The Fresno Police Department's chief of internal affairs was "unaware of the number of officers involved in repeat shootings until contacted by Winston."
  • Professional Victim

    This journalistic investigation is about using an agent by the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Prosecutor General's Office as a "victim." The office uses the "victim" in order to forge various criminal cases. There had always been rumors that the police used such agents, but the public in the country of Georgia did not have any real information about these agents. The faked victim in this case was Vagarshak (Gaikovich) Loris-Ruso. He has been used by the General Inspection of the Ministry of Internal Affairs in order to "disclose" criminal cases of bribery. From July 2004 to 2007, he took part in six criminal cases. The journalists became interested in his past and found him in four other criminal cases. The investigation showed that he had been cooperating with the police and helped them to arrest undesirable people. The investigation consisted of two parts. The first part of the story was about Alexhandre Mkheidze, and his detention, trial and verdict. In this case, Vagarshak admitted to cooperating with the police and receiving money for it. The second part of the investigation is about eight other criminal cases and shows the accusation, official grounds and certain objections for each case.