Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "islamic state" ...

  • Canada’s Jewish Schindler

    VICE News' reporter Rachel Browne investigates the Liberation of Christian and Yazidi Children of Iraq, which claimed to be using the group's funds to rescue hundreds of Yazidi women and girls who had been captured as slaves by Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria. Browne was the first person to report on their concerns and allegations that he was committing a fraud, and actually using his donation money to pay Yazidi families to say he rescued their family members.
  • Homegrown Terror

    The Tribune-Review spent a year investigating the changing face of the terrorist threat in the age of the Islamic State. The series documents the ways in which domestic law enforcement, communities and individuals are affected by and adapting to the danger. It examines weaknesses in the ways agencies and communities respond, and gathers together history, research, the opinions of top experts, the capabilities of domestic security agencies and the limits of American law to put this growing threat in context. http://triblive.com/news/adminpage/8489172-74/somali-bihi-minneapolis#axzz3dQ6Qbq3d
  • Dirty Brigades: No Clean Hands in Iraq’s ISIS Fight

    Torture, beheadings, the cold blooded shooting of unarmed civilians, and all of it caught on camera in war-ravaged Iraq by the perpetrators acting with impunity. But the horror show was not by ISIS this time. An ABC News investigation, "Dirty Brigades: No Clean Hands in Iraq's ISIS Fight," found ample evidence of terrorist-like atrocities routinely committed over the past year by U.S.-trained Iraqi Security Forces, who Washington has been arming as the key to defeating ISIS. Incredibly, elite Iraqi Special Forces, special police and counterterrorism units were documenting their own horrific acts, filling the dark underbelly of Iraqi social media with gruesome snapshots and videos of their own war crimes in an apparent effort to stir up sectarian bloodlust. In the first in-depth exposé and analysis of these atrocities, the ABC News Brian Ross Investigative Unit, led by Producer James Gordon Meek, spent six months collecting and researching a photo and video gallery of horrors, interviewing human rights investigators, U.S. Special Forces veterans and diplomats who served in Iraq, as well as confronting both the American and Iraqi governments with their findings. The team presented the investigation to millions over three consecutive nights on ABC World News Tonight With David Muir, accompanied by in-depth digital reports, both print and broadcast, on ABCNews.com and ABC/Apple TV.
  • State of Terror

    In an unmatched examination of the Islamic State that began well before the attacks in Paris, The Times showed the secrets behind the group’s baffling resilience, tracking ISIS on battlefields in Syria, Libya and Iraq, and exposing its recruiting techniques, money trails and systematic policy of rape.
  • ISIS Hits Home: San Bernardino

    As news of the horrific San Bernadino unfolded and all three networks went into live coverage mode, the ABC News investigative team started digging , providing investigative reporting in real time, both accurate and exclusive coverage for to a national stunned by the first major domestic terror attack by followers of ISIS. Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and the ABC News Investigative team brought insights and exclusives starting with the first (and still exclusive ) photo of the female attacker Tashfeen Malik and perhaps the most riveting of images, the first exclusive look at the terror couple, husband and wife as they entered the United States through customs.
  • Corruption in Iraq

    Before the Iraqi district of Sinjar in Ninewa province fell into the hands of the Islamic State, foul drinking water was making people sick with preventable diseases. The U.S. tried to fix the problem by digging wells and treatment facilities, but poor oversight and shoddy work from contractors left the area no better than it had started, despite millions of dollars spent in reconstruction money. An investigation into Iraqi efforts to fix the problem after the U.S. withdrew showed that projects remained unfinished, but money for maintenance and fuel continued to pour into the pockets of local officials. In an area where extremists use frustration over corruption to recruit followers. the implications of this corruption couldn’t be more serious.
  • The Jihad Next Door: The Syrian Roots of Iraq’s Newest Civil War

    This is the first story to investigate and map out in detail how Al-Qaeda established a foothold in Syria after the start of the Syrian uprising in March 2011. It explains how the group now known as Islamic State used the Syrian conflict like an incubator, to rejuvenate, recruit and draw human and material resources to its base in Iraq via Syria. The story explains how the under-equipped, poorly organized moderate rebels lost ground to the increasingly influential Jabhat al-Nusra; how the West watched as a new, reformed and ultimately more dangerous version of Al-Qaeda quickly rose in Syria and reduced the space for others to operate in. Among its major findings, the piece lays bare how the Syrian government's release of jailed Islamists from its notorious Sednaya prison early in the revolution provided a ready-made network for Al-Qaeda to exploit.
  • Al Qaeda Reborn: On Europe's Doorstep

    A revolution that began with shots fired at peaceful protesters more than a thousand days ago is now a bloody civil war with no resolution in sight. But for many Syrians in battered rebel-held areas, a new, unimaginable, cruel dystopia has swallowed them. Infiltrating slowly at first, but now controlling many rebel held areas are the men of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. Many of them foreigners, they make up a hardline, radical, brutal al Qaeda linked group seeking a Taliban-esque society. It is Islamic law and al Qaeda's most radical followers are now visible from Turkey, a key part of NATO. In almost six months, the group has risen to take control of much of northern Syria, killing those who oppose them. Its power is only increasing. This is the new threat emerging inside Syria.
  • The Struggle Within Islam

    Powell draws from all over the Islamic world for this story. It profiles the family of Mohammed Shakr, whose son is edging toward fundamentalism and jihad. Powell takes a look at the "civil war" that has raged within Islam for years, intesifying since 9/11. Powell finds that "the number of Muslims expounding radical beliefs is clearly growing; the global war on terrorism has fueled perceptions that Islam is under attack; and America's war in Iraq has made it more difficult for patient voices inside Islamic states to be heard."