Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "juvenile justice" ...

  • WUFT: Cost of Sunshine

    Public record requests of various county and local governments were made in an effort to determine the number of public record requests received by each governmental unit, the cost to provide access to the requested records, the fees recovered from requestors, and copies of agency public record access policies. Those governmental units not audited received a survey designed to obtain the same information sought in the public record requests. Public record requests included all county constitutional officers in nine Florida counties as well as the city clerk in the county seat. County constitutional officers include the state attorney; sheriff; clerk of court; tax collector; property appraiser; supervisor of elections; public defender; and school superintendent. Counties were chosen based on geographic and population diversity. Six state agencies were also included: Executive Office of Governor, Attorney General,Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Department of Financial Services, Department of Juvenile Justice, Department of Veteran’s Affairs.
  • NBCLA: Pepper Spray Use Skyrockets at Juvenile Hall

    The use of pepper spray by probation officers at Los Angeles County juvenile halls and camps has skyrocketed over the last few years, prompting an investigation and raising concerns as similar agencies across the country are banning pepper spray use, citing health concerns.
  • Descent into Disorder

    An investigation into the state of Wisconsin's broken juvenile justice system and warning signs that were ignored for years, leaving young inmates injured and guards undertrained, overworked and largely unaccountable.
  • Out of Control: Inmate violence at state-run Martin Girls Academy has local staff, taxpayers paying

    Treasure Coast Newspapers’ reporter Melissa E. Holsman began investigating Martin Girls Academy after hearing from prosecutors, defense attorneys and others concerned with the sometimes brutal violence being reported at the facility since it opened in 2008. Records detail multiple assaults victimizing youth and, more often, employees. The monthslong research included reviewing hundreds of arrest and assault documents, juvenile justice reports, Department of Children and Families abuse records, videos capturing assaults at the complex and personal interviews with current and former staff, attorneys and state officials. Melissa found such a high level of violence within the facility that it is a safety hazard to employees and to the girls themselves. The violence also is costing Martin County taxpayers thousands of dollars annually.
  • Mass. courts fail to shield juveniles in holding areas

    Since Sept. 2010, Massachusetts has been in violation of a federal law requiring courthouses to protect juveniles from being verbally abused or threatened by adult inmates in courthouse holding areas. This has resulted in annual penalties that slashed about $500,000 in grant money intended for at-risk youth and intervention programs in the Massachusetts juvenile justice system. It’s a problem that will cost $1.34 million to fix 11 “high priority” courts, as Massachusetts officials sought — and failed to receive — a waiver from those penalties from the Justice Department.
  • Juvenile Justice?

    Project examines the impact a prosecutor's power to send youth to adult courts without judicial review has on juvenile plea deals and the length of juvenile detentions.
  • Juvenile Justice?

    A seven-month investigation by the Times-Union found that prosecutors in the Jacksonville area used the threat of adult charges to force low-risk juvenile defendants to accept plea deals that would send them to facilities meant for the most hardened juveniles – even in cases where the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice said those juveniles shouldn't have been locked up at all.
  • Prisoners of Profit

    HuffPost Business reporter Chris Kirkham exposes the corruption at juvenile for-profit prisons, boot camps and detention centers. From condoning abuse of inmates to neglect to corruption, Kirkham uncovers firsthand stories from those on the inside.
  • Trouble in Mind

    Brandi Grissom spent nearly six months investigating the life, trial, conviction and incarceration of Andre Thomas. The six-part series explores the intersections of the mental health and criminal justice systems in Texas through the case of Andre Thomas, a death row inmate who began exhibiting signs of mental illness as a boy and committed a brutal triple murder in 2004. Blind because he pulled out both of his eyes while behind bars, Thomas awaits a federal court's decision on whether he is sane enough to be executed. The series examines the gaps in the Texas mental health system: holes in public education, the troubled juvenile justice system, underfunded mental health care services for adults, unprepared prisons and the still-developing jurisprudence around brain science. In addition to producing six in-depth stories, Grissom partnered with data reporters in the newsroom to produce interactive graphics that helped readers understand that disparities in the mental health system. She also partnered with the graphics team to create a comprehensive interactive timeline that detailed the tragic events of Thomas’ life, his crime, and his case with court documents and photos.
  • Assault victim's tweets prompt contempt case

    For 17-year-old Savannah Dietrich, it was like being victimized twice – first by the two boys who sexually assaulted her while she was passed out and then sent photos of the assault to their friends; secondly, by a secretive juvenile justice system that appeared more interested in protecting her attackers than her. Frustrated by what she felt was a lenient plea bargain for her two attackers, Savannah lashed out on Twitter – despite a judge’s warning that no one should talk about the incident because the case was in juvenile court. "There you go, lock me up," Savannah tweeted, as she named the boys who she said sexually assaulted her. "I'm not protecting anyone that made my life a living Hell." Though threatened with contempt of court, Savannah refusal to stay quiet, and her decision to talk publicly to Courier-Journal reporter Jason Riley resulted in a series of stories that drew national attention and helped pry the lid off Kentucky’s secretive juvenile courts – potentially opening more cases in the future to ensure justice is done.