Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "l CAR" ...

  • Best for the children

    We revealed that at least 150 children have been abused in Sweden over the last three years, despite the fact that social services knew about their situation and should have been able to help them. Almost half of the children were children already in care, therefore even more vulnerable, where the social welfare service failed to act to help them, or acted in a way that increased their suffering. There are most probably many more children that have been abused, than the 150 we were able to detect. We were only able to survey the cases known to the Health and Social Care Inspectorate. But in our review we could reveal that 50 municipalities, one in six, have never reported any mistakes on serious misconduct concerning children. This is something that experts interpret as highly unlikely and a serious sign of underreporting.
  • Pain & Profit

    Pain & Profit revealed the terrible consequences of Texas officials' decision to turn over medical care for the state's sickest and most vulnerable citizens to for-profit health care companies. Foster children were denied critical nursing, disabled adults suffered without adequate treatment, and severely sick children lost access to their doctors -- all while companies received billions of dollars of taxpayer money. The state failed to oversee the corporations it hired; when it was told of problems, it covered them up. Our investigation into what's know as Medicaid managed care, which highlights a national problem, has already led to major changes in Texas.
  • Kaiser Health News: Nursing home investigations

    In a series of data-driven stories, Kaiser Health News revealed that tens of thousands of nursing home residents are dying because the facilities are woefully understaffed and painful infections are routinely left untreated or poorly cared for. In the most horrific cases, patients are cycling in out of hospitals with open wounds or bedsores that trigger sepsis or septic shock, a deadly bloodstream infection that is the leading killer in hospital ICUs.
  • KARE 11 Investigates: Double Billing the Badge - The Patrol Car Payback

    KARE 11's groundbreaking multi-year investigation "Double Billing the Badge - The Patrol Car Payback" exposed a complex scheme to overcharge hundreds of police agencies on thousands of squad cars. It led to a criminal conviction, reforms in state procurement policies, and a massive refund of taxpayer dollars.
  • TX Observer: Prison by Any Other Name

    Since the 1990s, Texas has run a controversial, constitutionally dubious “civil commitment” program that keeps hundreds of sex offenders in intensive monitoring and treatment long after they’ve finished their prison sentences. In 2015, after the agency running the program nearly imploded amid mismanagement, Texas lawmakers essentially turned civil commitment over to a scandal-ridden private prison contractor eager to gobble up contracts at the intersection of incarceration and therapy. The result: non-existent treatment, shoddy medical care, and a new taxpayer-funded, privately operated lockup in middle-of-nowhere Texas, where men under civil commitment are now confined indefinitely. Since the facility opened, only five men have been released — four of them to medical facilities where they later died.
  • DFP: Trooper tases teen on ATV. Police video reveals what happens next

    Readers had known about the tragic death of 15-year-old Damon Grimes, who crashed his ATV while running from State Police in Detroit. People knew a trooper had been charged with murder after leaning out of his patrol car to use his Taser on Grimes, causing the crash. But the details were limited. That’s until the Free Press used the Freedom of Information Act to obtain documents, raw video and radio broadcasts to reconstruct the scene before, during and after the accident. In a published story and never-before-seen video, the newspaper shined a spotlight on the actions of police that day. The video was made by piecing together hours of video and audio footage from police body cameras, dashboard cameras, surveillance tape and broadcasts. A Detroit officer whose inappropriate comments were caught on the video was reassigned.
  • Sex Offenders in Nursing Homes

    Our Fox 4 investigation discovered 200 registered sex offenders live in nursing homes, residential care facilities, and assisted living facilities in Missouri. Our statewide investigation revealed learned more than 95% of the offenders committed heinous crimes against children, including child molestation, aggravated sexual abuse, and sodomy. We learned Missouri law does not require these homes to disclose that registered sex offenders live in the facilities. There is also no state law requiring background checks on residents of these facilities.
  • KARE 11 Investigates: “Double Billing the Badge – The Patrol Car Payback”

    “Double Billing the Badge – The Patrol Car Payback” exposed a complex scheme to overcharge hundreds of police agencies on thousands of squad cars. It has prompted a criminal conviction, reforms in state procurement policies, and a massive refund of taxpayer dollars.
  • Just a Game?

    Fans of the National Football League cannot ignore the growing body of evidence revealing that the game is hurting – and perhaps killing – many of the men who play it. In a series of reports, KING 5 put a laser focus on Seattle’s hometown team, to show fans the devastating impacts on former Seahawks players. The two-year project included player surveys, interviews and documentation that exposed the challenges faced by Seahawks in their football afterlives.
  • AL.com: Doctor Sexual Misconduct

    Alabama’s doctor discipline system forgives sexually abusive doctors and allows them to continue practicing, often without alerting the public to their misconduct. This series examined how the system protects doctors, and it provided the public with an easy-to-search database of doctor discipline records.