Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "lack of oversight" ...

  • Blowing the Whistle on Aviation

    Our exclusive eleven-month investigation into aviation safety uncovered a corrupt culture of safety at major airlines and the Federal Aviation Administration that mechanics and FAA employees feared could be putting the flying public at risk. Before there was any reporting on the FAA related to Boeing’s 737 Max, we explored the overly cozy relationship between the FAA and airlines - highlighting the FAA’s lack of oversight on regulatory issues that would later lead to hundreds of deaths overseas and the grounding of all 737 Max airplanes.
  • A Tangled Web of Lies – the Southeastern Military Academy

    An investigation into abuse allegations at a private school uncover a lack of oversight of private schools in Florida and a system failing students and parents.
  • #MeToo Unmasks the Open Secret of Sexual Abuse in Yoga

    A KQED callout for #MeToo accounts in the Bay Area yoga world and our ensuing nine-month investigation revealed a range of allegations by seven women against five teachers: from inappropriate massage to a violating touch in class, from drugging to sex with a minor. I found that the yoga community is struggling to rein in this sexual misconduct and abuse in its ranks. Some experts believe the lack of oversight of teachers and schools is adding to the problems of an industry experiencing explosive growth, where touch and trust are a fundamental part of the practice.
  • Betrayal of Trust

    This investigation showed how a secretive court system and lack of oversight allowed a highly respected elder care lawyer to steal million from the senior citizens she was appointed to care for.
  • Trail of Troubles

    One doctor’s sexual assault charges led reporter Scott Dance to uncover the state’s lack of oversight of the criminal backgrounds of Maryland’s doctors. Maryland does not conduct criminal background checks of its doctors despite at least one attempt to require them. Dr. William Dando was one doctor who fell through the cracks. He was convicted of rape in the 1980s, and came to Maryland to pursue his medical career after his release. Fast forward to 2014, and the same doctor was accused of sexually assaulting several patients. Dance traced Dando’s time in Maryland and all of the ways his past could have been discovered, but state regulatory agencies and medical boards failed to investigate. After Dance’s articles appeared, Dando agreed to give up his license so that Maryland charges would be dropped, an inspector general highlighted flaws in licensing procedures,and the Maryland Board of Physicians proposed legislation to require background checks.
  • Trail of Troubles

    One doctor’s sexual assault charges led reporter Scott Dance to uncover the state’s lack of oversight of the criminal backgrounds of Maryland’s doctors. Maryland does not conduct criminal background checks of its doctors despite at least one attempt to require them. Dr. William Dando was one doctor who fell through the cracks. He was convicted of rape in the 1980s, and came to Maryland to pursue his medical career after his release. Fast forward to 2014, and the same doctor was accused of sexually assaulting several patients. Dance traced Dando’s time in Maryland and all of the ways his past could have been discovered, but state regulatory agencies and medical boards failed to investigate.
  • Deadly Impact

    This in-depth, nine month investigation by Chief Correspondent Brian Ross and Producer Cindy Galli was the first to disclose previously-secret company emails and documents, all pointing to an internal cover-up by guardrail manufacturer Trinity Industries. The company had modified a popular highway product without disclosing the changes to the government, as is required by law. That design change has now been blamed for injuries and deaths around the country. It also called into question the lack of oversight by the Federal Highway Administration. The first reports had an immediate impact as over a dozen states suspended purchases of the questionable guardrail end terminals in the days following the report. When we first reported our story, the Federal Highway Safety Administration said it considered the guardrail end terminals to be safe. Since our broadcast, more than 40 states have suspended the use of the devices and under growing pressure from congressional and state officials, the Federal Highway Administration has now ordered the company to conduct new safety tests which are currently ongoing .
  • Trashed Trailers

    Contaminated flood waters roared through Northern Colorado mobile home parks in September 2013. When the waters receded, some of the homes were soaked to the rooflines and were knocked from their foundations. Hundreds of the homes were condemned and left to rot and mold for months. Government officials presumed the homes would end up in landfills. However, a six-month 9Wants to Know investigation spanning five counties discovered profiteers were sneaking these mobile homes into new communities, fixing them up without proper building permits and safety inspections, and marketing them to unsuspecting families. 9Wants to Know found government regulators were blindsided by the flood trailer problem due to a tremendous lack of oversight in the mobile home industry. As a result of their investigation, government officials scrambled to identify the flooded homes and bar unsafe housing from their communities.
  • The Rise and Fall of a Patrón

    Our investigation showed how powerful political alliances helped United Neighborhood Organization (UNO) grow from a community group into a multimillion-dollar enterprise operating 16 taxpayer-funded charter schools, a janitorial firm and other businesses. We found a lack of oversight of charter school finances and operations cleared the way for alleged abuse. Specifically: UNO received more than $280 million in public money over the past five years but neither Chicago Public Schools nor the Illinois State Board of Education closely monitored how funds were spent. A large portion of the public money UNO collects goes to management fees, debt service and consultants rather than classrooms.
  • Should we “Fix” Intersex Children?

    This story showed how a lack of oversight is allowing doctors to carry out risky cosmetic surgeries on young children with intersex conditions. Around one in 2,000 children are born with sex organs that are not entirely male or female. The story focused on one of these children, ‘M’ who was born with an intersex condition and whose penis was cut off as a toddler to make him look like a girl. He is now ten and identifies as a boy. As well as the risk of assigning a child the wrong gender, these surgeries have a gut-wrenching list of side-effects including painful scarring, reduced sexual sensitivity, torn genital tissue, removal of natural hormones and possible sterilization. This story found that doctors have been aware of these risks since the 1990s when many advocates, adults and some within the medical profession called on the surgeries to be heavily restricted, but that many doctors continue to perform these operations.