Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "las vegas" ...

  • Las Vegas Review-Journal's Fight for Records

    The Las Vegas Review-Journal fought for and won access to vital public information in 2019, including police reports, investigative documents and lawsuits. And it took the fight all the way to the Nevada Legislature to do something our adversaries in the public sector thought was impossible: We helped strengthen the state’s previously toothless Public Records Act.
  • WSJ: The Fall of Steve Wynn

    Steve Wynn, the powerful casino executive considered the creator of modern Las Vegas, was responsible for a decadeslong pattern of sexual misconduct and harassment toward employees.
  • Post and Courier (SC): Dan Johnson investigation

    In a system with little scrutiny, prosecutor Dan Johnson used his office accounts like an ATM machine, dipping into public dollars to travel the globe, host lavish parties and buy everything from gym memberships to plane tickets to the Las Vegas strip.
  • KLAS: Driving Ms. Rezsetar

    These stories highlight problems at the top of the Health District, including a Chief that lives out of state, and a top enforcement officer with a suspended driver's license and a bench warrant. After the stories the enforcement chief was fired and an investigation was opened into the head of the health agency.
  • 60 Minutes: Flying Under the Radar

    On April 15th 2018, CBS News 60 MINUTES featured a two-part investigation into the safety record of one of the country’s most profitable airlines, Allegiant Air, a small, ultra-low-cost carrier based in Las Vegas. Over the course of seven months, correspondent Steve Kroft and his producers analyzed hundreds of federal aviation documents and interviewed pilots, mechanics and industry experts for a report that raised disturbing questions about the safety of Allegiant’s fleet. Although Allegiant flies less than 100 planes, our investigation found that over a 20-month period, the airline experienced over 100 serious mechanical problems, including mid-air engine failures, cabin depressurization, smoke in the cabin, flight control malfunctions, hydraulic leaks and aborted take-offs. The incidents forced Allegiant pilots to declare 46 in-flight emergencies and 60 unscheduled landings. Our expert sources said this was a remarkably high number of incidents for an airline this size.
  • Luxuries on public dime

    Based on public financial records obtained through an FOI request, a Belleville News-Democrat investigation found that more than $230,000 was spent on a taxpayer-supported American Express card over four years used by East St. Louis Township Supervisor Oliver Hamilton. He used the card to buy construction materials, take Las Vegas trips, purchase gas for his private vehicle, and buy dinners and gifts for political friends. Hamilton pleaded guilty to federal charges for misusing public funds.
  • Bled Dry

    When local hospitals shut their doors, communities usually blame poor economics or heavy regulation. But The Dallas Morning News found another reason for closures: Businessmen who bought ailing hospitals and siphoned off their cash, often leaving them vacant hulks in devastated towns. What may seem at first to be an unlikely scenario has played out not just in Texas, but across the country. One owner left a trail of 13 wrecked hospitals in seven states. In Nevada, a doctor who put down $10,000 to take over the only hospital between Reno and Las Vegas pulled out at least $8 million before the cash-starved medical center shut down. Federal regulators and most states don’t vet people who take over hospitals, The News discovered, and there is little financial oversight. Even when patient care suffers at these stripped facilities, regulators seldom hold those who profited accountable.
  • CBS News: Rape Kit Investigation

    Following the CBS News series that exposed more than 20,000 untested rape kits nationwide, Nancy Cordes revisited the Cleveland Police Department which told CBS they “had no idea how many kits they had and would not count.” Since this piece, they have found over 5,000 untested kits. A new county prosecutor, Tim McGinty, met with the State Attorney General to get funding to test ALL of the kits and conceded that mistakes were made and urged officials to dig into the “goldmine” of kits. After testing half of the kits they indicted over 200 rapists, a third of them are serial rapists. Our story broke the news that other cities had major problems with untested kits. We partnered with Joyful Heart Foundation to test all kits to break the news that some cities test 100% of their kits, but Las Vegas only tested 15% and Tulsa, Oklahoma has 3,400 untested kits. Since our story, Nevada Attorney General, Adam Laxalt, announced plans to tackle the backlog as one of his tasks in the New Year.
  • Hong Kong's back-room bookies go global thanks to online betting

    The South China Morning Post built on a court case in Las Vegas to document how figures linked to Hong Kong's organised crime world have moved from hosting VIPs in Macau's casinos to running online gambling websites, an unregulated industry in Asia used for massive laundering of crime proceeds. They worked with reporters in the US, Montenegro, Singapore, Germany, Costa Rica, Italy, Malaysia, Thailand and Spain to document a key figure's global footprint. The Las Vegas court case allowed us to do documents-based investigative reporting on triad societies probably for the first time since the territory's return to China.
  • Biggest of the Smalls: The Rise of a Federal Contractor

    In the last decade, the federal government has made an unprecedented push to direct work to small businesses in order to help such firms gain a foothold in the U.S. economy. The amount of money devoted to small business contracting rose 70 percent to $90 billion annually during that period. In this tide of spending, one firm stood out as the paragon of success: MicroTechnologies LLC. Records show it received $1.4 billion in federal technology deals over nine years, much of it reserved for small firms own by minority and service-disabled veteran entrepreneurs. MicroTech became the fastest growing small contractor in the nation. Founder Anthony R. Jimenez, declared it to be the "Biggest of the Smalls." Those deals transformed Jimenez's lifestyle. He bought a mansion -- and then commissioned a quarter-million entertainment system for it. He began driving a $190,000 Mercedes coupe. And he became a top sponsor of multiple martial arts "cage fighting," routinely flying to Las Vegas at company expense. “I am living the American Dream,” he said in a letter to The Washington Post. But MicroTech's extraordinary ascent begged a simple-seeming question: How could such a large company still be eligible to receive contracts set aside for small firms? Until The Post's Robert O'Harrow Jr. dug in, no one in the media or government knew the answer or bothered to check. O'Harrow pushed ahead the old fashioned way: he issued Freedom of Information Act Requests for contracting documents and demanded government officials open their files. His investigation found that MicroTech had misled the government and the public about its ownership and operations to get access to preferential contracts and burnish its own image. In doing so, the firm abused taxpayers and deprived other small firms access to hundreds of million in deals. In response to those findings, the government suspended MicroTech from contracting and changed some contracting rules. Two inspectors general offices are investigating and Congress has launched its own probes.