Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "map" ...

  • Cops and Robbers

    This series charts the path of perhaps the most corrupt officer to wear a Baltimore Police badge, from his history of ignored complaints of abuse and untruthfulness to showing the depths of crimes uncovered by a federal investigation, including drug trafficking and robbery. The story maps out how the corruption was not an isolated event confined to a particular unit, but rather ingrained in the culture of “plainclothes” police units long relied on to combat crime. It exposes new allegations, and educates readers who might otherwise not understand the negative effects of aggressive policing employed in Baltimore’s most high-crime neighborhoods.
  • Bombs In Your Backyard: Investigating One of America’s Greatest Polluters

    The military might of the United States has come at an extraordinary environmental price. The nation’s defense technologies and armaments have been developed, tested, stored, decommissioned and disposed of on vast tracts of American soil, where they have polluted fields and rivers, contaminated drinking water and put legions of people’s health at risk. For the first time, this project examined the full extent of the damage — 39,000 sites adding up to an area larger than the state of Florida, affecting millions of people. Our stories exposed the Pentagon’s routine practice of open burning of hazardous waste; its reliance on incompetent or fraudulent contractors that dump waste or fake cleanups; its four-decade campaign to make a dangerous and pervasive chemical explosive appear safe and avoid regulation; and its explicit refusal to comply with federal environmental laws even when the exposure of young children to lead poisoning from munition was at stake. We gained exclusive access to the Pentagon’s complete environmental dataset, and created a news application which for the first time mapped searchable data about contaminated sites across U.S. territories.
  • Bombs In Your Backyard

    The military might of the United States has come at an extraordinary environmental price. The nation’s defense technologies and armaments have been developed, tested, stored, decommissioned and disposed of on vast tracts of American soil, where they have polluted fields and rivers, contaminated drinking water and put legions of people’s health at risk. For the first time, this project examined the full extent of the damage — 39,000 sites adding up to an area larger than the state of Florida, affecting millions of people. Our stories exposed the Pentagon’s routine practice of open burning of hazardous waste; its reliance on incompetent or fraudulent contractors that dump waste or fake cleanups; its four-decade campaign to make a dangerous and pervasive chemical explosive appear safe and avoid regulation; and its explicit refusal to comply with federal environmental laws even when the exposure of young children to lead poisoning from munition was at stake. We gained exclusive access to the Pentagon’s complete environmental dataset, and created a news application which for the first time mapped searchable data about contaminated sites across U.S. territories.
  • ABC10: GSK

    I created a StoryMap of all the Golden State Killer's alleged crimes using both existing maps/data from the FBI and the Sacramento County District Attorney's Office, as well as locations from a local author chronicling the Golden State Killer. Moreover, I edited/produced the TV piece explaining the map.
  • ProPublica: Flood Thy Neighbor

    The U.S. has long built levees to protect communities from floods, but levees have a side effect: by lowering flood risk in one area, they actually raise the flood risks for neighboring towns. Our multimedia series uses maps, videos and interactives — including a giant diorama of a flowing river that we designed with university researchers — to show how current levee policies are flawed, and the consequences for local residents.
  • Arizona Daily Star: Evictions

    Reporter Emily Bregel spent seven months investigating the problem of evictions and lack of affordable housing in Pima County, Arizona. The series ran in print over three days and highlighted the chaotic fall-out following an eviction, the reasons why experts said evictions were about to surge in Pima County and the City of Tucson, as well as the failures in the justice court system that deals with eviction cases. The online story also featured an introductory video created by Emily Bregel and video editor Nick Murray, an interactive map of evictions, audio clips from relevant eviction hears and multiple graphics.
  • Fighting The Wrong Fires

    OPB’s science and environment team spent a year analyzing government data, reviewing scientific literature and interviewing more than 100 people to find out why firefighting costs have soared and why, 30 years after its scientists first raised red flags, the U.S. Forest Service continues to risk lives and waste millions of dollars fighting fires it doesn't need to fight.
  • Myanmar Burning

    A Reuters series documents the mass expulsion of the Rohingya from Myanmar, including the investigation that landed our reporters in prison.
  • Where's the party at?

    The Daily Wildcat set out to answer the age old question: where's the party at? Through FOIAs for police records The Daily Wildcat was able to collect data on where the Tucson Police Department had issued red tags, which are the citations for unruly gatherings that are commonly doled out when parties get out of hand. They created a heat map of the red tags issued around campus and created interactive data visualizations on the frequency of when red tags were issued by day of the week and calendar month.
  • America’s atomic vets: ‘We were used as guinea pigs – every one of us’

    Atomic veterans feel abused, neglected and forgotten by the government and a country that exposed them to unforeseen risks. In the decades since the nuclear tests, many have suffered ailments such as cancer and blame the radiation. https://www.retroreport.org/video/atomic-vets/ https://www.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=4481099eafd746ff8e79bb13a6596e79