Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "medical board" ...

  • WEWS-TV: Prescription for Failure

    In the last two decades, prescription opioids have taken an unrelenting hold on Ohio. The opioid crisis has claimed the lives of thousands of users, landing Ohio on a top five list no one wants to be on: the most opioid-related overdose deaths in the country. For years, media across the country and the state have reported about the devastating impacts of the crisis, but during its exclusive investigation, the WEWS 5 On Your Side Investigative team was the first to uncover the “why.” The team spent six months tracing the opioid crisis to its beginning as well as examining how the state medical board, the group charged with regulating doctors, played a role.
  • L.A. Times: Scandal at USC: A Bad Gynecologist and the Fall of a University President

    A Los Angeles Times investigation exposed Dr. George Tyndall, the University of Southern California gynecologist now accused of sexually abusing hundreds of students, and the high-level administrative cover-up that allowed him to practice for decades and then leave campus with a secret payout and a clean medical board record.
  • AL.com: Doctor Sexual Misconduct

    Alabama’s doctor discipline system forgives sexually abusive doctors and allows them to continue practicing, often without alerting the public to their misconduct. This series examined how the system protects doctors, and it provided the public with an easy-to-search database of doctor discipline records.
  • Trail of Troubles

    One doctor’s sexual assault charges led reporter Scott Dance to uncover the state’s lack of oversight of the criminal backgrounds of Maryland’s doctors. Maryland does not conduct criminal background checks of its doctors despite at least one attempt to require them. Dr. William Dando was one doctor who fell through the cracks. He was convicted of rape in the 1980s, and came to Maryland to pursue his medical career after his release. Fast forward to 2014, and the same doctor was accused of sexually assaulting several patients. Dance traced Dando’s time in Maryland and all of the ways his past could have been discovered, but state regulatory agencies and medical boards failed to investigate. After Dance’s articles appeared, Dando agreed to give up his license so that Maryland charges would be dropped, an inspector general highlighted flaws in licensing procedures,and the Maryland Board of Physicians proposed legislation to require background checks.
  • Doctors in Georgia

    The citizens of Georgia are largely dependent on the state's medical board to protect them from incompetent or unscrupulous. These stories revealed that the board has failed to carry out that mission - by licensing doctors that other states considered untouchable, leaving patients in the dark about key issues such as the true nature of disciplinary actions and funneling some of the worst physicians into the state prison system.
  • Trail of Troubles

    One doctor’s sexual assault charges led reporter Scott Dance to uncover the state’s lack of oversight of the criminal backgrounds of Maryland’s doctors. Maryland does not conduct criminal background checks of its doctors despite at least one attempt to require them. Dr. William Dando was one doctor who fell through the cracks. He was convicted of rape in the 1980s, and came to Maryland to pursue his medical career after his release. Fast forward to 2014, and the same doctor was accused of sexually assaulting several patients. Dance traced Dando’s time in Maryland and all of the ways his past could have been discovered, but state regulatory agencies and medical boards failed to investigate.
  • Despite multiple malpractice payouts, doctors often keep practicing

    This story looked at how effective medical boards are at stopping dangerous doctors from practicing medicine. We used a state database to identify the 25 Florida doctors with the most malpractice payouts since 2000. We then looked at how many of these doctors had been stopped from practicing by the Florida Board of Medicine. Turns out, just four of them lost their licenses - and three of those four only lost them after they had been arrested and charged with either drug trafficking or billing fraud. The fourth lost his license after he failed to comply with the terms of a lesser punishment. In other words, not a single one of them had been stopped from practicing due to poor medical care.
  • StarTribune: Discipline Deferred

    A six-month investigation by the Star Tribune found that the Minnesota Board of Medical Practice, once considered a national leader in the regulation of licensed physicians, often doesn’t punish doctors whose mistakes harm patients or who demonstrate a pattern of substandard care. After analyzing information compiled by a national databank and reviewing thousands of pages of court and medical board records, the reporters found that the board, which regulates 20,000 physicians in the state, has been reluctant to punish some doctors who have harmed patients, including more than 100 doctors who were disciplined by other states and even doctors who lost privileges to practice at Minnesota hospitals. The investigation also showed that the board lags behind boards in other states in disclosing information to the public, including data on malpractice judgments or settlements. It also doesn’t disclose whether doctors have been disciplined by regulators in other states or lost their privileges to work in hospitals and other facilities for surgical mistakes and other problems.
  • Special Treatment: Disciplining Doctors

    Hospitals and state medical boards across the United States have given physicians repeated chances to keep practicing, despite well-documented alcohol and drug problems. Even doctors that have criminal records do not have their doctor's licenses revoked. This is due partially to the practice that allows doctors to move to another state and start a new job before the paperwork being slowly processed caught up with them. It is also due to loopholes in the National Practitioner Data Bank.
  • A Surgeon's Trail

    The News & Observer found that a partially blind neurosurgeon with a history of malpractice lawsuits was allowed to continue to practice medicine. The North Carolina Medical Board had gaps in licensing and oversight that enabled this mistake, and it failed to investigate claims against the doctor.