Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "mortgage lending" ...

  • Reveal: Kept Out

    Fifty years ago, the Fair Housing Act banned government-sponsored racial discrimination in mortgage lending, known as redlining. But black and Latino borrowers continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgages at rates far higher than their white counterparts. Kept Out, a multi-platform investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, is based on a yearlong analysis of 31 million mortgage records. Reveal found this modern-day redlining in 61 metro areas, even when people of color make the same amount of money, take on the same amount of debt and look to live in a similar neighborhood as white borrowers.
  • Kept Out

    Fifty years ago, the Fair Housing Act banned government-sponsored racial discrimination in mortgage lending, known as redlining. But black and Latino borrowers continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgages at rates far higher than their white counterparts. Kept Out, a multi-platform investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, is based on a yearlong analysis of 31 million mortgage records. Reveal found this modern-day redlining in 61 metro areas, even when people of color make the same amount of money, take on the same amount of debt and look to live in a similar neighborhood as white borrowers.
  • We Sell Houses (and Sometimes Ruin Lives)

    Scott Wizig is a Houston-based real estate king with an appalling track record in Houston, Buffalo, and Baltimore. Houston Press first reported on Wizig in 2004, after he was run out of Buffalo. They decided to follow up on him in 2014 after a group of community non-profits in Baltimore sued him for sitting on dozens of vacant, blighted homes that were deemed health and safety hazards. The Texas Department of Savings and Mortgage Lending appears to be the only Texas entity keeping an eye on Wizig, but even though he's repeatedly violated disclosure laws, the penalties are a pittance. Wizig also has exploited flaws in county record-keeping and eviction courts that have allowed him to foreclose on property he doesn't really own.
  • The Final Frontier

    This investigation looks into the Chicago Housing Authority and demographic changes that have occurred with the destruction of public housing. Starting with 1995, The Chicago Reporter analyzed residential property transactions and home mortgage lending data, as well as Census data to track significant racial and economic shifts over the years.
  • Brokered Dreams

    Ohio leads the nation in home foreclosures.Some reasons discovered in this investigation were: mortgage lending is not covered under laws that prohibit deceptive sales practices; Ohio and Virginia are the only two states whose consumer protection laws do not cover mortgage lending; appraisers do not have to be licensed; and millions in licensing fees have been diverted from enforcement of lending laws to the general fund.
  • The Hard Truth In Lending

    This three-day series looked at many facets of home lending. The reporters used mortgage loan data from 25 top lenders to show that blacks who bought homes in communities across America in 2004 were four times as likely as whites to get high interest rates for mortgage loans. The interest rate disparities occurred even when blacks had substantially higher incomes.
  • Locked Out: The Color of Credit

    This article focuses on how race played into home mortgage lending in the Nashville area, showing that African-American home owners were more often denied for mortgage loans "up to three times more often than whites even when incomes were similar." This data was comparable to cities of similar size to Nashville, such as Charlotte, N.C., and Austin, TX. There was also an investigation into cultural differences up for debate as to the discrepancies and discrimination.
  • The Color Threshold

    Reporters from The Argus, analyzed the home mortgage lending to find stark disparities in denial rates for people from ethnic minorities. They found that Hispanics and Blacks were twice as likely to be turned down in the various counties in California. The article also concentrated on possible ways of solving the problem.
  • Open for Foreclosure

    From the questionnaire, "Exponential rise in sub-prime home mortgage lending accompanies spike in foreclosures, leaving low-income homeowners in the streets."
  • Swimming with Sharks: Subprime lenders put the bite on Baltimore's poorest homeowners

    "In the 1970's, there was the original 'redlining' - financial institutions literally drawing red lines around African-American neighborhoods in which they refused to make loans...In recent years, a new twist on redlining has emerged, and once again low-income, mostly African-American residents are it target." Baltimore's City Paper takes a look at the process of predatory-lending that takes place within the inner-city thanks to 'subprime' mortgages. Subprime mortgages are high-interest, high fee loans that trap low-income in a cycle of hidden costs, defaults on loans, and foreclosure.