Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "multiple sclerosis" ...

  • Pay for Delay

    Are generic drugs delayed to market by so-called “pay-for-delay” deals between brand and generic drug manufacturers? PBS NewsHour Weekend investigated these deals and other practices that opponents like the Federal Trade Commission say are meant to impede generic competition and protect profits. PBS NewsHour Weekend profiled Karen Winkler, a 46-year-old mother of three with Multiple Sclerosis. A deal was struck over her M.S. drug that opponents say delayed the generic to market. Then, the manufacturer raised the price to get patients to switch to its new extended-release version. Unable to afford it, Karen went off the drug until it went generic in 2012. PBS NewsHour Weekend shed light on complicated, secretive pharmaceutical deals rarely examined on national TV. These deals affect thousands of patients, but few know anything about them. And in cases like Winkler’s, they can have profound consequences.
  • Stonewall

    This story addresses clause in Ohio's Bioterrorism Bill, which allows it to hide information gathered during public health investigations. The reporter discovered that hiding this information was more of a pattern than an exception. She found examples of the Department's efforts to bury information, stonewall citizens, and downplay health risks. For example...in one community, data was skewed to show no link between toxins in the soil and local leukemia cases. Not only does the Health Department hide this information, they make it nearly impossible to retrieve, by ignoring information requests...even the State Attorney General couldn't get answers to its health-related inquiry.
  • (Untitled)

    The Sciences investigates how a small-time diary farmer inspired a crusade that threatens to breach the wall between conventional and "alternative" medicine. Ever since he cured his own back troubles, people with allergies, with AIDS, with multiple sclerosis or leukemia have been coming to Herb Saunders for an illegal, $2,500 colostrum treatment. Now supporters of "alternative" medicine want to pass Senate Bill 1035 to allow licensed medical practitioners to treat patients with any type of therapy at all. (November/December 1996)
  • (Untitled)

    The Deseret (UT) News, in a yearlong project, finds evidence that the government secretly bombarded Utah with more nerve gas, germ warfare, nuclear fallout and other radioactive dust, which was spread by bombs, airplanes, artillery and intentional nuclear reactor meltdowns. Among other findings, the series details the activities of the Army, and the fact that a group of prison inmates were injected with radioactive material, 1994.