Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "murder trial" ...

  • Scenes of a Crime

    'Scenes of a Crime' explores a 10-hour interrogation culminating in a disputed confession, and an intense, high-profile murder trial in New York state. In September 2008, an infant named Matthew Thomas lies brain dead in a hospital, and his doctor misdiagnoses a skull fracture. The doctor tells Troy, New York police that the child has been murdered, and the detectives bring the baby’s father, Adrian Thomas, in for questioning. Police video of the interrogation reveals the complicated psychological contest between detectives and their suspect over many hours, including lies, threats and coercion that are legally permitted by most courts.
  • The Real CSI

    Evidence collected at crime scenes—everything from fingerprints to bite marks—is routinely called upon in the courtroom to prosecute the most difficult crimes and put the guilty behind bars. And though glamorized on commercial television, in the real world, it’s not so cut-and-dried. A joint investigation by FRONTLINE, ProPublica and the Investigative Reporting Program at UC Berkeley examines the reliability of the science behind forensics in The Real CSI. From the sensational murder trial of Casey Anthony to the credentialing of forensic experts, “The Real CSI” documents how a field with few uniform standards and unproven science can undermine the search for justice. The investigation follows a landmark study by the National Academy of Sciences that called into question the tenets of forensic science. For the first time, Harry T. Edwards, a senior federal appellate court judge and co-chairman of the report, sits for an interview to discuss what the report means. And, FRONTLINE examines one of the most high-profile terrorist investigations since 9/11: the case of Brandon Mayfield, an attorney who was wrongfully identified and arrested as a suspect in the Madrid commuter train bombings after the FBI erroneously matched his fingerprint to a partial print found at the scene. In “The Real CSI,” FRONTLINE correspondent Lowell Bergman finds serious flaws in some of the best known tools of forensic science, wide inconsistencies in how forensic evidence is presented in the courtroom and no system in place for establishing the credibility of so-called “forensic experts” whose testimony can lead to a conviction.
  • Failed Justice: Investigations in Minnesota

    An MPR News investigation of an obscure murder case in rural Minnesota revealed shoddy work and incorrect testimony by the state's most prominent medical examiner, who has testified at more than 100 murder trials over the past three decades.
  • Finger prints

    For almost a century, fingerprint evidence has been a revered cornerstone of the American criminal justice system. But that may soon change. Last fall, in a Baltimore murder case, a judge ruled that fingerprint analysis is not reliable, which shocked lawyers across the country and could possibly put thousands of criminal investigations in jeopardy. CBS News spent months researching the use of fingerprints in murder trials as well as assessing the future of fingerprint evidence.
  • Tales of a Mafia Mistress

    The biggest mafia case of 2007 was the Roy Lindley DeVecchio murder trial, where the defendant was a decorated ex-FBI agent. The whole case rested on the mistress of gangster Greg Scarpa Sr., Linda Schiro.
  • Striking Differences

    This team of reporters spent two years gathering and analyzing jury data from felony court trials to see if racial discrimination still played a key role in jury selection. The investigation found that prosecutors tend to reject African-American jurors, while defense attorneys tended to retain them. Consequently, the number of African-Americans serving on juries in Dallas more or less mirrored the breakdown of the population.
  • Night of the Devil

    This book tells the hitherto untold story of Thomas Trantino and the Angel Lounge killings. The book exposes the various ways in which Trantino's murder trial was mishandled and shows multiple problems within the judicial system.
  • Gunning For Eddie

    The New Times reports on the saga of former Hollywood nightclub owner Eddie Nash, who evaded prosecution for murder, arson and drug dealing. Nash walked away from a conviction in the high-profile Wonderland Avenue murder trial -- twice -- but in 1997 a former business partner admitted to involvement in bribing a jury member. At the time the article was written Nash was awaiting trial under the RICO act.
  • Queer on Death Row

    The Village Voice looks at how sexual orientation can - and often does - sway a jury's verdict. "No one knows how often gayness is raised by prosecutors as a snide implication, an unfounded assertion, or a fact that may or may not be relevant to the case. But it comes up with such frequency and in such predictable ways that the allegations of antigay bias cannot be dismissed."
  • Case Closed

    CBS News 60 MINUTES reports that "... In one of the most controversial baby murder trials of this century, British nanny Louise Woodward was convicted of shaking to death a baby under her care. It was an outcome that greatly unsettled the medical community. How could distinguished medical experts on both sides differ so much on how the baby actually died? ... 60 MINUTES decided... to reexamine the forensic evidence with the help of one of the nation's top medical experts -- an independent pediatric neuropathologist.... (and) reached the shocking conclusion that both the prosecution and defense had failed to correctly diagnose the cause of death, while failing to detect many serious injuries inflicted upon the baby..."