Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "murders" ...

  • Terror in Little Saigon

    FRONTLINE and ProPublica team up to investigate a wave of terror that targeted Vietnamese-American journalists. Uncovering a trail that leads from American cities to jungles in Southeast Asia, FRONTLINE and ProPublica shine new light on a series of unsolved murders and attacks. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/terror-in-little-saigon/
  • Unreasonable Doubt: Did Kelly Siegler Really Railroad an Innocent Man Eight Years Ago?

    The story investigates the troubling findings of a judge who recommended that a man convicted in 2007 of killing his pregnant wife receive a new trial.
  • Double life: Cop by day, gang member by night

    San Antonio is a market where viewers are drawn to crime coverage. It has its share of murders. KSAT tends to cover them in one day, then move on. When an off-duty police officer was killed and the agency investigating his death clammed up, that was something that seemed odd to KSAT. There was no praise of his life and career by his brothers and sisters in blue. Within 24 hours of his death, they began to peel back the image of an officer who proudly wore a badge and swore to protect and serve his community to see one who took a different oath that cost him his life. He was also a member of a notoriously violent gang: the Texas Mexican Mafia.
  • Kaufman County Prosecutor Murders

    A series of hard-hitting investigative stories provided readers with an unmatched view into into the murders of two Texas prosecutors. The reporters' stories revealed exclusive details about the prime suspect, the crimes, and raised important questions about how the investigation was conducted. These hard-hitting stories were produced in addition to breaking news story on this national story.
  • Colorado's Failing Parole System

    A father of three, gunned down for his pizza delivery uniform. That uniform is then used in the murder of Colorado’s Prisons Chief, shot and killed when he answered his front door. The man who carried out the killings: a career criminal on parole. A series of Call7 Breaking News Investigations uncovers the catastrophic failure of Colorado’s parole division. Failures that allowed a parolee identified as high risk and assigned a specially trained officer, to commit murder- twice. A parolee absconder who Call7 Investigator Theresa Marchetta uncovered committed both murders while “off the grid” as parole officers at all levels ignored critical alerts he was on the run for nearly a week. Marchetta holds officials accountable for the fatal oversights that took place. Her investigations led to immediate and long-term meaningful changes at the Colorado Department of Corrections, including a new policy requiring officers to respond to ankle bracelet tamper alerts, new equipment for parole officers, legislative hearings and a change in leadership at the parole division.
  • Tracking Danger

    Two men murdered in a matter of days in seemingly unrelated incidents. A shootout in Texas with a Colorado parolee on the run. Call7 Investigator Theresa Marchetta breaking exclusive information in the days that followed that would broaden the size and scope of the investigation. Her series of Call7 Breaking News Investigations uncovers the catastrophic failure of Colorado’s parole division. Failures that allowed a parolee identified as high risk and assigned a specially trained officer, to commit murder- twice. A parolee absconder who Marchetta uncovered committed both murders as parole officers ignored critical alerts. Marchetta holds officials accountable for the fatal oversights and presses for meaningful changes to better protect Coloradans.
  • A Vicious Cycle: Broken Homes, Deadly Streets, Shattered Lives.

    The 54 minute documentary “A Vicious Cycle” is a groundbreaking and deeply personal look at the causes and impact of violent crime in the St. Louis area, which includes East St. Louis and Washington Park, Illinois, the communities with the highest murder rates in America. The documentary is the result of five months of investigation and interviews with victims, their families, former gang leaders, police, and social workers. The program is divided into four segments; (1) overview with victims and a deep look at causes of violent crime, (2) unprecedented access with one St. Louis family with 2 sons behind bars and the father of 1 son also in prison, (3) an inside look at how police are fighting crime, (4) and the emotional ending focusing on social programs that successfully bring broken families together. In 2011, there were 11 murders in Washington Park, Illinois, 1 for every 370 residents, which is 8 times the murder rate of St. Louis, a city that has one of the highest murder rates in the country. We explore the many contributing factors in the region's most violent neighborhoods, including extreme poverty, lower levels of education and home ownership, single parent families and segregation. We also examine the life of a former gang leader who was arrested more than 40 times, including arrests for 2 murders. A unique part of our program is a deeply personal investigation of the destruction of one St. Louis family. That segment, part two of our program, is 13 minutes long. The mother agreed to talk about her family because of the “pull of the streets” that lured all 3 of her sons into a gang. Our investigation learned that it was the collapse of the family, particularly their mother’s mental problems and substance abuse that really pushed the boys into the streets to find more structure and a sense of family. What follows is a rare look inside a family in crisis, featuring on-camera interviews behind bars with two sons and the father. One son is mentally ill, suicidal and has 7 children. During the interviews we learn that the root of the family’s collapse was the mother’s repeated abuse and neglect when she was a young child. The segment also includes interviews with the victims of other son’s violent crimes, including a murder he committed when he was just 19.
  • "Under the Curse of Cartels"

    This project gave readers an unprecedented look at the highly-organized drug trafficking organizations that had taken control of Oregon's drug underworld. This was not just a report about drug dealing. This was about execution-style murders never before publicly linked to Mexican drug cartels. This was about tracing how a cartel-linked trafficker set up a national drug distribution network from rural towns in Oregon. This was about the price paid by end users, including a harrowing account of a young man's death from a heroin overdose. Drug arrests were not news in Oregon. Police agencies routinely issue press releases, prosecutors hold news conferences, and photos of seized drugs and money handed out. That's where the coverage often ends. "Under the Curse of Cartels" documented the true scale behind this drug trafficking -- the sophisticated organizations, their ruthless control, and their elaborate counter-surveillance efforts to detect police investigations. The project took reporting on drug trafficking to a new level with the intimate insider details from both sides of the law. The series was a shocking wake up for Oregon, including many in the law enforcement community who didn't have access to the kind of information collated by The Oregonian.
  • Serial Secrets: Catching a Killer

    "Serial Secrets: Catching a Killer" chronicles a Vermont police investigation into the mysterious disappearance of a suburban couple. Bill and Lorraine Currier were abducted from their Vermont home and brutally murdered by a serial killer. He would evade authorities for more than year. In that time, he would kill again. My coverage was the first to reveal his identity and how dangerous he really was. Despite being stonewalled at every turn, I was able to bring viewers exclusive reports that eventually sparked debate about the use of unnamed sources and the public's right to know details about an ongoing criminal case. The FBI has since revealed that Israel Keyes planned his murders years in advance, burying "kill kits" across the country. He confessed to murdering at least eight victims over the past decade before committing suicide in December. The details of his kills still haunt Vermonters today.
  • The Deadliest Place in Mexico

    The Juarez Valley, a narrow corridor of green farmland carved from the Chihuahuan desert along the Rio Grande, was once known for its cotton, which rivaled Egypt’s. But that was before the Juarez cartel moved in to set up a lucrative drug smuggling trade. “The Deadliest Place in Mexico” explores untold aspects of Mexico’s drug war as it has played out in the small farming communities of this valley. The violence began in 2008, when the Sinaloa cartel moved in to take over the Juarez cartel’s turf. The Mexican government sent in the military to quell the violence — but instead the murder rate exploded. While the bloodshed in the nearby City of Juarez attracted widespread media attention, the violence spilling into the rural Juarez Valley received far less, eve as the killings began to escalate in brutal ways. Community advocates, elected officials, even police officers were shot down in the streets. Several residents were stabbed in the face with ice picks. By 2009, the valley, with a population of 20,000, had a murder rate six times higher than Juarez itself. Newspapers began to call the rural farming region the “Valley of Death.” This investigation uses extensive Freedom of Information Act requests, court documents, and difficult-to-obtain interviews in Spanish and English with current and former Juarez Valley residents, Mexican officials, narcotraffickers and U.S. and Mexican law enforcement officials, to reveal that many of these shocking deaths were perpetrated with the participation of Mexican authorities. It shows scenes of devastation — households where six members of a single family were killed, without a single police investigation. It uncovers targeted killings by masked gunmen of community activists and innocent residents for speaking out against violence and repression facilitated by corrupt military and government officials. And it gathers multiple witnesses who describe soldiers themselves, working in league with the Sinaloa cartel, perpetrating violence against civilians. "The cemeteries are all full. There isn't anywhere left to bury the bodies," one former resident said. "You'll find nothing there but ghost towns and soldiers."