Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "murders" ...

  • The Lockheed Martin Shooting

    The murder of six employees at Lockheed Martin's aircraft assembly plant in Meridian, Mississippi, was characterized by the county sheriff and Lockheed spokespeople as a typical act of tragic workplace violence. A Primetime Live investigation revealed the racial motivation of the crime and found that Lockheed Martin had known about the murderer's history of making racial threats in the workplace. The investigation also revealed that Lockheed Martin plants across the country had numerous incidents of racially charged threats and hate speech at work among employees. Court records of the Mississippi murders were sealed, but Dateline interviewed plant employees in order to reconstruct the crime.
  • Man of the Mob

    Craig's series covers the release of Rochester mobster Tom Marotta from prison and his return to crime. Craig also tells the story of how police used insights into how the mob works, which they gained by watching Marotta after his release, to solve two notorious cold cases from the mob's heyday.
  • Learning to Hit a Lick

    These articles, written in a narrative form, chronicle the life of a teenage prostitute turned triple -murderer. The first article explores how she ended up working as a prostitute and the role her pimp played in the murders. The second part shows how violent crime previously existed in two of the victims' families.
  • Border Killings

    While digging for evidence in the backyard of a suspected drug dealer in Mexico, authorities came across the bodies of 11 people, all believed to be involved in drug trafficking. But what's more shocking is the fact that the murders were linked to Mexican police officers and a U.S.-paid FBI informant. According to the questionnaire, "our investigation helped expose the complicity of the U.S. government as its agents listened live while their own informant took part in the killing of at least threee suspected drug traffickers."
  • Deadly Moves

    The Chicago Housing Authority's Plan for Tranformation was an effort to demolish the city's public housing buildings and replace them with mixed-income neighborhoods. But the demolition puts competing street gangs and drug dealers in small public housing spaces. The number of murders has increased since 2000. The reporters uncover whether this plan has a negative or positive impact, and what the city plans to do about the growing conflict.
  • Lords of Bakersfield

    From the questionnaire, "The Californian exposed the depths and extent to which the assistant district attorney of Kern County, Calif., went to manipulate and control the teenage son of one of his longest serving and most faithful investigators. The Californian also examined a series of murders dating back to the late 1970s, up to the present, that suggested a pattern of corruption at the higest levels of Kern County's government. Powerful mein were alleged to have used their positions to cover up their own, and others' duplicitous lives in which they secretly used teenage boys for sex. Cases involving the alleged conspirators, known as the Lords of Bakersfield, occasionally ended in murder."
  • Disposable People

    This article chronicles a series of murders of transgendered women in Washington D.C., and investigates the national problem of hate crimes against the transgender community. Through interviews with family members, friends, activists, local police and hate-crime experts, the story explores the causes and consequences of anti-transgender hatred. Finally, the Reporter finds that 14 transgendered women were murdered in possible hate crimes in 2002 and 13 in the first nine months of 2003.
  • Casualties of Peace

    A nearly-two year long investigation by the Dayton Daily News discovered widespread violence, including murders, against volunteers in the Peace Corps. "They have died at the rate of about one every two months since 1962," and "reported incidents of assault on volunteers more than doubled since 1991," with women the prime targets of such attacks. This seven-part series -- based on interviews with more than 500 people in nearly a dozen countries and a crime incident database obtained from the Peace Corps after a lengthy court battle -- reveals a disturbing pattern of unsafe conditions that were long masked or even covered up by the Peace Corps. In ten death cases examined by the Daily News, the paper found the "Peace Corps misled families, the public or other volunteers about the circumstances of the deaths." The Corps' policies resulted in sending ill-trained volunteers "alone to some of the most dangerous corners of the world where they may be unsupervised for months on end." These volunteers, frequently young people fresh out of school, receive little to no training about what they will encounter and how to stay safe. The newspaper's investigation also found the behavior of Peace Corps volunteers themselves often puts them at risk. "Alcohol was identified as a factor in nearly one in three assaults since 1999," and "in more than half of the reported rapes since 1990, the attacker was identified as a 'friend/acquaintance.'"
  • Public payroll series; Harper family murders; Arvin grand jury investigation

    The Bakersfield Californian uses open public records to investigate government issues. State employees such as school principals were making twice the state average. Reporters uncovered these statistics using records open to the public. They also found that firefighters were raking in money as part of their overtime commitments. The second set of stories investigates the multiple murders in Bakersfield where the suspect is a elementary school vice principal. Another story covers how the newspaper has defended an unprecedented restraint attempt by the county grand jury.
  • The Lords of Bakersfield

    "The Californian exposed the depths and extent to which the assistant district attorney of Kern County, Calif., went to manipulate and control the teenage son of one of his longest-serving and most faithful investigators. The Californian also examined a series of murders dating back to the late 1970s, up to the present, that suggested a pattern of corruption at the highest levels of Kern's county government. Powerful men were alleged to have used their positions to cover up their own, and others', duplicitous lives in which they secretly used teenage boys for sex. Cases involving the alleged conspirators, known as the Lords of Bakersfield, occasionally ended in murder."