Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "nuclear weapons" ...

  • 50 Years since the Chinese Cultural Revolution and North Korea: Does the Hydrogen Bomb Test Signal the North Korean Version of the Cultural Revolution?

    North Korea ran a hydrogen bomb test in January, 2016. Some think this signaled the start of Kim Jong-Un’s version of the Cultural Revolution because China’s Cultural Revolution began around the time of their nuclear bomb test in 1964 and their hydrogen bomb test in 1966. The Chinese Cultural Revolution was a sort of power struggle by Mao Zedong where he used the power of the public to get rid of his opponents within the Communist Party and climb back to the top over a period of 10 years starting in 1966. Chinese society ended up with deep scars from hatred and vengeance because of it. For the 50th year anniversary of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, we explore the current state of North Korea’s Kim Jong-Un’s regime, which is carrying out deep-rooted idolization tactics internally while running nuclear weapons and missile tests externally, and try to predict the future of North Korea.
  • Los Alamos Whistleblower

    Nuclear policy specialist James Doyle received clearance from Los Alamos to publish an article questioning the doctrine of nuclear deterrence in an international journal, but after it appeared a House Armed Services Committee staffer complained about it, and Los Alamos decided the article contained national security secrets. As a result, Doyle was stripped of his security clearances and eventually fired when the Center for Public Integrity inquired about his employment dispute. While the government would not say what part of Doyle’s article contained national security secrets, experts told the Center it was most likely a reference to Israel’s possession of nuclear weapons – a “secret” hardly worth its name.
  • Nuclear Missteps

    Beginning with his discovery of an internal Air Force admission of "rot" infesting its nuclear missile forces, AP National Security Writer Robert Burns probed to extraordinary depths within this highly secretive, rarely investigated organization for eight months to reveal a series of missteps by men and women with their finger on the trigger of the world's most deadly weapons. Using sources inside and outside the Air Force, in Washington and beyond, Burns documented deliberate safety and security violations, personal misbehavior, training failures, leadership lapses and chilling evidence of malaise among those entrusted with nuclear weapons. Burns peeled away the veneer of Air Force assurances that nothing was amiss, and brought to the attention of the American public a fuller picture of a nuclear missile force facing an uncertain future. His reporting prompted the Secretary of Defense, Chuck Hagel, to lament these "troubling lapses" and make a personal visit tot he force to insist they live up to their standards and demonstrate that they can be trusted with nuclear responsibilities.
  • Nuclear Waste

    What could possibly be wrongheaded about a U.S.-Russian effort to eliminate 64 tons of plutonium that could be fashioned into thousands of nuclear weapons? Begun in the 1990’s, it was blessed by four presidents, including Barack Obama, who called it an important way “to prevent terrorists from acquiring nuclear weapons.” To carry it out, the federal government spent billions of dollars on a South Carolina plant to transform the Cold War detritus into fuel for civilian nuclear power plants, an act meant to turn swords into ploughshares — all with surprisingly little debate or oversight in Washington. When the Center for Public Integrity looked closely at the project, after hearing of some of its troubles, we found plenty of scandal. Our major conclusions are reported in our "Nuclear Waste" series of four articles totaling around 12,000 words that were published in June 2013.
  • Waste Lands

    Today, they have long been converted into parks, office buildings and even hiking trails. But in a remarkable investigation, two of our most intrepid reporters discovered that in these places once stood factories and research centers that the government pressed into service to produce nuclear weapons. A yearlong effort resulted in revelations about what happened to the atomic waste from these facilities and a first-of-its-kind online historical database on more than 500 sites. The government, primarily the Energy Department, has for years assured the public the waste is being cleaned up efficiently and with no harm to anyone. It plans to have spent an estimated $350 billion before the work is done. But despite all this funding, as reporters John Emshwiller and Jeremy Singer-Vine discovered, the government hasn’t been able to find even the exact address of some of these facilities. Records on other sites are so spotty no real determination can be made on the next step. And 20 of the sites that were initially declared safe have required a second, and sometimes third, cleanup over the years. Thanks to an effort that married 21st-century Internet analysis with old-fashioned reporting, online readers can now enter their ZIP Code to get a full history of any site near them. The detail of this database—including hundreds of documents, corporate photos of factories and interviews with current property owners, most of whom had no idea of their property’s Cold War legacy—makes for helpful and at times alarming reading. Not surprisingly, almost a half a million online hits were recorded in the first weeks after our project, called Waste Lands, was published.
  • 2001 Oak Ridge Nuclear Cavitation Confirmation Uncovered

    "2001 Oak Ridge Nuclear Cavitation Confirmation Uncovered" is a 12-part investigative series that appeared in the summer of 2013 in New Energy Times. The series is about the 2001-02 conflict surrounding experiments performed in the nuclear weapons facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratories. The key events took place a decade ago, and the most crucial facts of this conflict had never been published. These facts reverse the commonly understood outcome of this scientific finding and correct the historical record. This investigation also reveals the dark side of science, how scientists can and do neglect their social responsibility, abuse their power, and behave unscientifically. It reveals the devastating price paid by other scientists who assume that scientific facts can speak for themselves, and how they fail to understand the tremendous impact of science media on public opinion.
  • Fallout: The True Story of the CIA's Secret War on Nuclear Trafficking

    Using confidential documents from government sources and dozens of interviews with key players, the authors revealed how for more than a quarter of a century, while the Central Intelligence Agency turned a dismissive eye, a globe-straddling network run by Pakistani scientist A. Q. Khan sold the equipment and expertise to make nuclear weapons to a rogues' gallery of nations.
  • "Iran's Manhattan Project"

    This investigative report reveals how Iran has "been able to launder billions" of dollars, with assistance from New York banks, to improve their nuclear weapons program. The U.S. has relied on "unenforceable sanctions" that have allowed Iran to easily bypass the measures in place. After their permission to film was "revoked," the investigative team posed as tourists to get the rest of the story.
  • Assault on Pelindaba

    "Assault on Pelindaba is a story about global nuclear weapons proliferation and the very real threat of nuclear terrorism post 9/11. Experts agree that acquiring plutonium or highly enriched uranium, the material to actually make a nuclear weapon, is not easy."
  • America and the Islamic Bomb: The Deadly Compromise

    The book "chronicles the role the United States and its allies played in allowing Pakistan to first develop and then peddle nuclear weapons technology."