Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "overtime" ...

  • The Daily News: Detective Do-Little

    The Daily News’ investigation into Detective Thomas Rice exposed that he was fabricating fake witness names and addresses and repeatedly using them to close grand larceny cases on a significant scale in the Ozone Park section of Queens. Instead of being fired, Rice was transferred to another precinct, docked just 20 vacation days, and allowed to keep his detective rank and salary including overtime, while running his snow blowing and power washing company on the side with NYPD approval.
  • State Police Troopers, Supervisors Charged in Overtime Scandal

    Dozens of respected members of the Massachusetts State Police are suspended, so far ten have been criminally charged, and the investigations by federal and state prosecutors are continuing with more arrests expected in 2019. All of this is the result of a massive overtime scheme that was uncovered by 5 Investigates, the investigative team at WCVB in Boston. This is a precedent setting scandal that has unfolded in Massachusetts since our initial investigation. The work of 5 Investigates began in 2017 with dozens of public records requests and our first story in October that revealed supervisors and troopers who appeared to be earning thousands of dollars in overtime they never worked. By early 2018, we began to see significant developments -- suspensions, arrests for theft of taxpayer money, and a response from the Governor that resulted in some of the largest reforms within the State Police that Massachusetts has ever seen.
  • City Grapples with LAPD's overtime pay

    Overtime at the Lost Angeles Police Department jumped 150 percent over the last decade.
  • Austin Emergency Response Failures

    This series of investigative stories uncovered an overwhelmed 9-1-1 center staff during the deadly “Halloween Flood” of 2013 in Austin, Texas and triggered proposed changes to Austin’s 9-1-1 system. Open records requests returned 9-1-1 calls and emails showing the impact earlier cost-cutting decisions had the morning of the flood. The records we uncovered show the City of Austin was underprepared to respond to this overnight emergency and any others of its scale. The series morphed into an examination of the City of Austin’s 9-1-1 center and how years of neglect led to a controversial and unreported plan to save overtime. After the City of Austin released its final flood report and KXAN questioned the small number of recommendations, police leaders announced a 9-1-1 system audit. After KXAN reported a leaked draft, police amended a budget list of critical needs requesting 36 new 9-1-1 positions.
  • Ticket-Rigging Traffic Enforcement

    The KHOU I-Team discovered how a group of officers in Houston Police Department’s elite Traffic Enforcement Division listed each other on speeding tickets when they were never there--all to later collect more overtime when they appeared in court. In case after case, records showed an officer was writing a ticket at one location, but at the exact same time on the exact same day, he was listed as a “witnessing officer” on a ticket at a completely different location, miles away. One of the targets of the ticket-rigging scheme committed suicide after learning he was under investigation by the Houston Police Internal Affairs Division. The Houston City Prosecutor's office dismissed more than six thousand tickets by the officers in question "in the interest of justice."
  • Cops. Cash. Cocaine.

    Rather than chase drug dealers out of town, police in the city of Sunrise invited them in. The suburban South Florida town has no great cocaine trafficking problem, but police found that selling kilos of the drug, at a discount, could make them millions. The Sun Sentinel exposed the undercover operation and provided a unique look at how far one local police department would go to use forfeiture laws to seize cash and assets from criminal suspects. Many of the deals took place in and around family restaurants, such as TGI Fridays, near the town’s main attraction, a sprawling outlet mall. Police often engineered the stings with the help of a professional lady informant. The newspaper found the city had paid her more than $800,000 over five years to target individuals and draw them into Sunrise. Cops working the stings had a financial incentive too: they made considerable overtime from forfeiture funds.
  • Governor'Security Detail Overtime Tops $1 Million

    A six-month long investigation reveals that, despite campaigning on promises of cutting overtime costs for state employees, Governor Dannel Malloy own security team has racked up more than $1.1 million dollars in overtime in his first two years in office. That is more than the combined overtime costs for the security details of both the previous governor and lieutenant governor. Much of the overtime comes from Governor Malloy's extensive national and international travel, something critics deride as Malloy's bid for national exposure. A follow-up story found costs for the Governor's highly criticized trip to the White House Correspondents' Dinner cost $4800, despite the administration's previous claims that there was no taxpayer expense involved in the trip. Since the stories aired, the trip costs and overtime expenses for Malloy's security detail have become a campaign issue.
  • Outside the Lines: Cowboys Clothing Controversy

    Last year, the Dallas Cowboys ranked third in the NFL in merchandise sales, and three years ago their operation generated more than $90 million. But virtually none of the shirts, jerseys and jackets made for "America's Team" is made in America. Instead, Cowboys merchandise is produced all over the world, and in some cases, in factories that are considered sweatshops, where workers make 29 cents per hour. Currently, claims of labor rights violations, such as mandatory overtime and unfair pay, are coming from workers in some overseas factories that produce Cowboys' apparel. Outside the Lines traveled to Cambodia to visit two of those factories.
  • Wage Theft In the Fields

    American farmworkers have often experienced egregious abuses, but nothing is more pervasive, nor harder to ferret out, than the wage theft that results from a practice called farm-labor contracting. Found in the fields of every handpicked crop in the country, farm-labor contractors not only provide growers with crews, but also handle wages and manage everything from verifying immigration status to providing workers' compensation. The problem is, the contractors systematically underpay the workers. “Farm labor contractors,” says writer Tracie McMillan, “give American produce growers what companies like China's Foxconn offer to Apple: a way to outsource a costly and complicated part of the business, often saving money in the process and creating a firewall between the brand and the working conditions under which its products are made.” And yet McMillan — a fellow with both the Knight-Wallace program at University of Michigan, and the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University — found that enforcement is rare: In 2008, inspectors visited only 1,499 of the more than 2 million farms nationwide; in 2011, California inspectors found just seven minimum wage violations on the state’s 86,000 farms. Fines are minimal: “It's cheaper to violate the law than to follow the law,” says one farmworker advocate. And wage theft is tedious to prove, requiring inspectors to interview workers, analyze time cards, and collect payroll records. That's why workers and their advocates in California are counting on a lawsuit brought earlier this year on behalf of two farmworkers against the contractors who hired them—as well as the growers who outsourced the work. The suit alleges that the contractors routinely undercounted the hours worked, failed to pay minimum wage or overtime, failed to provide safe or sanitary working conditions, and housed the workers in unsafe and unsanitary living quarters. The “collective action” suit—open to anyone who can prove he or she experienced the same treatment—may cover thousands of workers and deliver awards substantial enough to deter other employers from the same practices.
  • Public Salary Database

    The reporters set out to track the total cost of employment for state workers, tracking everything from the amount of taxpayer money that goes toward health benefits to overtime and even retirement benefits.