Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "parties" ...

  • Pentagon secretly struck back against Iranian cyberspies targeting U.S. ships

    In the middle of June, tensions were rising between the United States and Iran. Iran had attacked oil tankers traveling through the Strait of Hormuz, and then downed an expensive, high-tech Navy RQ-4 Global Hawk surveillance drone flying over the Strait, upping the ante of the conflict. Given previous rhetoric from Trump administration officials including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo against the Iranian regime, the decision to exit the Iran deal or the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, and the increasingly heavy sanctions on Iran, the Yahoo News team was monitoring for chances to report in more depth on specific Iranian capabilities as well as U.S. plans to counter them. Following the attack on the U.S. drone, Yahoo News began communicating with sources who had extensive detail on a specific unit within the Iranian military in the cross-hairs of the U.S. military, a unit that had advanced its cyber capabilities to the point that it was able to track nearly all ships traveling through the Strait through both social engineering, or pretending to be attractive women engaging with service members traveling on the ships, to actually compromising ship GPS data websites in order to digitally monitor their paths. In the course of reporting, Yahoo News discovered a key, news breaking event—that just hours prior, the U.S. Cyber Command had launched a retaliatory strike aimed at limiting the capabilities of the specific Iranian cyber group the team had already been investigating. Yahoo was the first to break the news of the retaliatory strike, leading dozens of major news outlets to race to match the story. However, given the fact Yahoo News was investigating details into the cyber unit, our story was not only first but best and most detailed. The story demonstrates our ability to jump into the news cycle, provide key breaking news to our readers, as well as dig deep into illuminating new details. The story also revealed that Iranian capabilities to intercept and down drones to study them for espionage purposes was highly advanced, a fact previously unknown. Given President Trump’s recent decision to authorize a strike to kill IRGC Commander Qasem Suleimani, our reporting will continue to provide value to readers, analysts, and other interested parties hoping to better understand Iranian capabilities and how the U.S. might respond to them.
  • Postmedia: Follow the Money

    Follow the Money is a data journalism project conceived by reporter Zane Schwartz as part of a year-long Postmedia fellowship. “I was frustrated by the way donations to politicians are recorded,” says Schwartz. “We know money matters in politics, but figuring out who is consistently giving that money to candidates and parties requires a level of detective-work out of reach for the average voter.” To address this gap, Schwartz worked with a team of journalists at Postmedia to create an accessible search tool for contributions at both the federal level and in every province and territory — a first of its kind.
  • Post and Courier (SC): Dan Johnson investigation

    In a system with little scrutiny, prosecutor Dan Johnson used his office accounts like an ATM machine, dipping into public dollars to travel the globe, host lavish parties and buy everything from gym memberships to plane tickets to the Las Vegas strip.
  • Hachette Books: Billion Dollar Whale

    In 2009, a mild-mannered graduate of the Wharton School of Business set in motion a fraud of unprecedented gall and magnitude—“like 100 heist movies strung together” (Matt Taibbi)—and one that would eventually ensnare leading bankers and even threaten the future of investment behemoth Goldman Sachs. The story of “the $5 billion swindle known as 1MDB” would become “a textbook case of financial fraud in the modern age" (New York Times). Over a decade, Jho Low siphoned billions from an investment fund—seemingly under the nose of financial watchdogs. He used the money to purchase luxury real estate, to throw champagne-drenched parties with celebrities like Leonardo DiCaprio and Paris Hilton, and even to finance Hollywood films like The Wolf of Wall Street. As his scheme finally unraveled, with his yacht and private jet seized, Low disappeared. Billion Dollar Whale reveals the full story of the financial world’s most unlikely fugitive—a harrowing parable of hubris and greed in the twenty-first century.
  • Full Measure: The Foreign Connection

    Foreigners are barred from directly giving money to American politicians and political parties. But it turns out, there’s a legal way around that. It involves well-connected middlemen in the U.S., PR firms, and lobbyists, acting as foreign agents. They’re paid huge sums to get foreigners access to U.S. government officials that most Americans will never have. They may even help write our laws and direct your tax dollars to foreign interests. And when so many are talking about a foreign issue- for example, Russia, you can bet foreign agents are in the background pulling strings. For the past eight months, we’ve been examining The Foreign Connection to Russia and Ukraine.
  • Where's the party at?

    The Daily Wildcat set out to answer the age old question: where's the party at? Through FOIAs for police records The Daily Wildcat was able to collect data on where the Tucson Police Department had issued red tags, which are the citations for unruly gatherings that are commonly doled out when parties get out of hand. They created a heat map of the red tags issued around campus and created interactive data visualizations on the frequency of when red tags were issued by day of the week and calendar month.
  • 911 Dispatch Delay

    In November of 2012, a man dialed 911 for help from his apartment which had caught fire. The fire spread quickly while he was on the phone with 911. The fire took his life. An internal investigation that began the next morning and continued for the next year determined a failure to properly dispatch the fire department led to a nearly five minute delay in response. It was only the second time in the history of the Onondaga County 911 center a dispatch delay had led, in part, to a fatality. The delay was never revealed. Not to the man's family, the fire department or the public. Three years after the fire our investigation of more than eight months led to all of those parties learning of the deadly delay. We also discovered the dispatcher who was determined to be at fault served no punishment and was not retrained. http://cnycentral.com/news/local/911-commissioner-5-minute-dispatch-delay-blamed-partly-for-fiery-death http://cnycentral.com/news/local/fire-victim-tells-911-call-taker-i-dont-want-to-die-during-dispatch-delay https://youtu.be/WqkQpYKN65E https://youtu.be/TAsu2G4oWpo https://youtu.be/vLbMZltc-sE https://youtu.be/IGy14aM64GI
  • Fixed Fortunes: Biggest corporate political interests spend billions, get trillions

    In the era of billion-dollar presidential campaigns and political groups that can raise donations in unlimited amounts from almost any source, we are used to reading stories about the large amounts of money that special interests invest in politics. But what do they get out of the government they spend so much trying to influence by supporting political campaigns and parties or hiring well-connected lobbyists?
  • What Voters Don't Know: Tales of Campaign Finance Subterfuge

    It's easier now than ever for political candidates and their parties to take in and spend huge amounts money in perfectly legal, aboveboard transactions -- and for others to do so on their behalf. Still, there's plenty going on in the world of political money that intentionally is kept in the shadows, whether in the name of monetary or political profit, to keep benefactors' roles secret or simply to fatten a candidate's campaign fund with creative accounting. All of this activity keeps crucial information from the voting public. The Center for Responsive Politics' entry of five stories that sheds light on several different political money schemes that twisted the standard template of candidates, PACs and parties raising and spending funds and reporting details of those activities to regulators.
  • Saric

    The book "Saric" follows the rise of the Balkan narco-cartel and details its drug smuggling, money laundering, and corruption of politicians and businesses. The year 2004 was a breakthrough for Balkan organized crime. After Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Đinđić was assassinated in 2003, police dismantled most of crime groups in the country. Big criminals understood that to keep operating they had to change and operate smarter. They did. They formed a syndicate, they stoped selling drugs inside the country and they moved into European markets. Through their new cartel they earned billions and have used it to buy political parties, police and control over the economies of Serbia, Montenegro and other countries.