Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "people of color" ...

  • Reveal: Kept Out

    Fifty years ago, the Fair Housing Act banned government-sponsored racial discrimination in mortgage lending, known as redlining. But black and Latino borrowers continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgages at rates far higher than their white counterparts. Kept Out, a multi-platform investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, is based on a yearlong analysis of 31 million mortgage records. Reveal found this modern-day redlining in 61 metro areas, even when people of color make the same amount of money, take on the same amount of debt and look to live in a similar neighborhood as white borrowers.
  • Silicon Valley’s Hidden Figures

    Silicon Valley has a big diversity problem. But no one has been able to comprehensively quantify it until now. Some of the multibillion-dollar companies that fuel the global economy have sought to hide how few women and people of color they have in their organizations, refusing to release the data, claiming the information is a trade secret. We built the largest and most comprehensive database of diversity employment data for Silicon Valley available. Through a groundbreaking collaboration with a University of Massachusetts Amherst sociologist, we got Equal Employment Opportunity Council (EEOC) data for 177 of the largest tech companies through public records requests and a successful FOIA lawsuit. Through this data, we uncovered disparities and ranked companies based on their diversity scores. By establishing a baseline of comparative data, we were able to hold companies accountable for their diversity hiring practices for the first time. Because of our analysis, the public now knows some of the worst companies when it comes to diversity in Silicon Valley. But we also found that diversity is not an impossible goal to achieve for technology companies: some are doing much better than their peers.
  • Kept Out

    Fifty years ago, the Fair Housing Act banned government-sponsored racial discrimination in mortgage lending, known as redlining. But black and Latino borrowers continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgages at rates far higher than their white counterparts. Kept Out, a multi-platform investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, is based on a yearlong analysis of 31 million mortgage records. Reveal found this modern-day redlining in 61 metro areas, even when people of color make the same amount of money, take on the same amount of debt and look to live in a similar neighborhood as white borrowers.
  • How the Government Put Tens of Thousands of People at Risk of a Deadly Disease

    An in-depth investigation into valley fever in California prisons and how the state put tens of thousands of people at risk of a deadly disease. Major findings include evidence that the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation did little to mitigate the problem, ignored data and internal reports suggesting the disease affected people of color more seriously and quashed a federal study of the epidemic within state prisons.
  • Locked Out

    The Oregonian spent six months investigating the location of subsidized housing in the Portland area and related failures under the nation's Fair Housing Act. Although the federal law was supposed to fight housing discrimination and end segregation, the newspaper found that investments controlled and funded by government have often been in the region's poorest neighborhoods and areas with high minority concentrations. Because people of color often have a greater need for subsidized housing, these spending decisions reinforce and perpetuate segregation in a largely white metro area.
  • "The Lonely Soldier"

    In her book, author Helen Benedict reveals what it is like to be a female in the military and serving overseas. She shares stories of sexual abuse and "discrimination against women and people of color." Female soldiers also suffer from health problems caused by the "lack of adequate medical care for women." Benedict also looks at the lives of women after they return home who suffer from isolation and "multiples traumas of combat and sexual assault."
  • Judging the Jury

    For the first time ever, reporters at WHDH-TV in Boston analyzed the racial makeup of federal juries in Massachusetts. What they found was that, in some cases, jury pools had no people of color whatsoever, which led to all white juries. According to their investigation, minorities remained underrepresented in the justice system as much as 50 percent of the time. The reason? Jury pools are chosen according to who responds to the town census. Because it is an unfunded mandate, many low income neighborhoods do a bad job of responding to the census, while the affluent neighborhoods fair much better. These are the neighborhoods with the highest returns and they are the ones repeatedly being called for jury duty.
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    The Humanist describes how people of color within the United States are being subjected to more than their fair share of America's industrial waste; because of unfair zoning practices, unenforced laws and bad planning minorities are exposed harmful toxins, July/August 1994.
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    Atlanta Journal covers covenants on an Atlanta suburb's deeds barring people of color from purchasing property, July 20, 1987.