Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "pipeline" ...

  • Profiting from Prisoners

    "Profiting from Prisoners" is a multiplatform investigative project revealing how financial companies have become central players in a multi-billion dollar economy that shifts the costs of incarceration onto the families of prison inmates and helps private companies profit from these captive customers. The stories and documentary put human faces on a growing structural inequity in society: As mass incarceration stretches prison budgets, prisons are cutting back on basic services like providing toilet paper and winter clothes for inmates. Families are forced to close the gap by paying into a hidden, multi-billion dollar pipeline of cash – facilitated by financial companies – that flows directly from relatives’ pockets to the coffers of prisons and the vendors they employ. The series’ second major story, based on previously undisclosed government documents, detailed multi-year, no-bid contracts granted to Bank of America and JP Morgan to provide financial and other services in federal prisons.
  • Crude oil in Pittsburgh

    North America is now one of the biggest producers of crude oil in the world, partly because of fracking in North Dakota and other Western states. With a lack of pipelines in place to move the oil, much of it has been pushed onto the rails. Much of that oil is moved in tank cars found to spill their loads when accidents occur. With the increased traffic, accidents have piled up across North America. Refineries processing much of the crude from the Bakken formation in the West are in the Philadelphia area. In May, the federal government told the railroads to give that information to states where they shipped large quantities of crude. Many states made the information public, but Pennsylvania was one of the states that opted out, citing that the information was “confidential” and “proprietary” to railroads. The state emergency response agency denied our public records requests (as well as other news agencies requests) for the information. PublicSource wanted to show people where trains were traveling in Pittsburgh and the potential affected population living around those lines.
  • The Invisible Threat

    This series reveals a threat that seeps into every nook and cranny of the United States. The country's network of natural-gas distribution lines, which is distinct from interstate transmission lines, covers almost 1.3 million miles of pipeline, some of it dating to the 1800s, Accidents involving those lines have killed more than 120 people, injured more than 500 others and caused more than $775 million in damage since 2004, a Tribune-Review analysis of federal records shows. Yet the location, age and safety of more than a million miles of those pipelines remain shrouded in secrecy. Not even government regulators and emergency responders have pipeline maps.
  • Shadow Money

    With our ongoing investigation of "dark money" in politics, OpenSecrets Blog (run by the Center for Responsive Politics) has repeatedly broken new ground in revealing the cash pipeline of some of the groups that have been most active trying to influence elections and national policy. These groups -- tax-exempt nonprofits that don't have to reveal their funding sources -- spent more than $300 million in the 2012 elections, mostly on TV ads, and have continued to spend to set the stage for the next election cycle. No other news organization has done more to shine light on these secretive groups that use confusion and ambiguity in both tax law and election law to spend big money in elections around the country.
  • The Dilbit Disaster

    The 10 stories we’ve submitted expose serious flaws in federal and state regulations that are supposed to ensure the safety of the nation’s oil pipelines. These flaws are of particular concern right now, because the regulations are setting the standards for thousands of miles of new pipelines that are being built or repurposed to carry heavy crude oil from Canada’s tar sands region. U.S. imports of this type of oil, which is turned into a fuel known as dilbit, are expected to quadruple in the coming decade. The core of our reporting is a three-part narrative about a 2010 pipeline accident in Michigan, “The Dilbit Disaster: Inside The Biggest Oil Spill You’ve Never Heard Of,” which also appeared as an e-book. In the other stories that appeared during our 15-month investigation, we applied what we learned from that disaster to the proposed pipeline projects, including the Keystone XL and the replacement of the Michigan pipeline that ruptured in 2010.
  • Investigation of fatal pipeline blast

    Before the National Transportation Safety Board issued its findings into the 2010 natural gas pipeline explosion in San Bruno that killed eight people, the San Francisco Chronicle had already exposed negligent management by pipeline operator Pacific Gas and Electric Co. and lax regulation by the state and federal governments that contributed to a disaster.
  • Are Our Pipelines Safe?

    A look at whether or not D.C.'s largest utility company, Washington Gas, neglects natural gas leaks, putting the public at risk.
  • Pipeline

    A specialty investigative news site by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that focuses on natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale that lies beneath Appalachia.
  • Grounds for Removal

    The four-year investigation detailed the government oversight of the nation's largest statewide natural gas pipeline system. Regulators rarely gave penalties, even in cases of fatal gas explosions.
  • Grounds for Removal

    This investigation reveals lax government oversight of the nation's largest statewide natural gas pipeline system. It shows Texas regulators failing to conduct proper oversight and rarely penalized gas companies after fatal gas explosions.