Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "police brutality" ...

  • Asbury Park Press: Protecting the Shield

    Killed. Beaten. Stalked. More than 200 citizens across New Jersey have been victimized in recent years by out-of-control rogue cops. In many cases, the cops kept their jobs, even got promoted – while tens of millions of your tax dollars kept the abuses quiet. Until now.
  • Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Troubled officer kills wife, her friend and himself

    A troubled Georgia police officer with a history of violence and dishonesty shot and killed his wife, her male friend and himself in June 2018. An AJC breaking news investigation revealed that prosecutors and the local law enforcement community for years enabled Officer Robert Sasser and looked the other way in the face of a documented pattern of misconduct. This helped set the stage for his final violent act.
  • Justice is not Blind

    Despite Canada’s dropping crime rate, incarceration rates of Indigenous people have been on the rise. Racial profiling and police brutality claims have increased throughout the Prairies but are often dismissed as isolated incidents by police departments. There is very little available data or research to verify whether or not the complaints are symptomatic of a larger systemic issue. Discourse Media and Maclean’s magazine collaborated on a months long investigation looking into whether the experience of Indigenous university students mirrored racial profiling claims in the Prairies, and to better understand student perceptions of police. Discourse Media designed, administered and analyzed a survey that showed that for those surveyed, Indigenous students have greater odds of being stopped by police than non-Indigenous students — and they believe their race is a factor.
  • The death of Freddie Gray

    The April death of a West Baltimore man in police custody quickly spiraled into a controversy that left some city neighborhoods in flames, and brought attention from national and international media. Within days, the name Freddie Gray became associated with the broader debate over the way police across the nation treated African-Americans. Central to that debate was a singular question: How did Gray die? The Baltimore Sun set out to provide an answer by investigating allegations of police brutality and dissecting the crucial minutes after Gray was arrested. Reporters revealed that Gray was not the first person to be seriously injured in a police transport van, and that officers routinely ignored calls by detainees for medical care. http://data.baltimoresun.com/news/police-convictions/ http://data.baltimoresun.com/news/intake-logs/rejections/ http://data.baltimoresun.com/freddie-gray/
  • Shock & Awe: Miami Cops Misuse Tasers, With Deadly Results

    This article exposes Taser abuse by police officers in Miami, Florida. On August 6, 2013, Miami Beach Police fatally tasered 18-year-old Israel Hernandez after catching him spray-painting graffiti on an abandoned McDonald's. Miami New Times reporter Michael E. Miller broke the story, and then followed it up with a dozen other articles on Hernandez's case. Miller compiled thousands of pages of records that showed local officers were overusing and misusing these devices, resulting in injuries and – in some cases – even death. His reporting showed cops often ignored their own departments' procedures on Taser use, yet were never held accountable.
  • Undue Force

    For six months reporter Mark Puente investigated how widespread police brutality was in Baltimore. He used court records and trial transcripts, but the heart of the reporting came from coaxing subjects to tell their stories. In addition, to the human toll, the investigation revealed that the city was paying millions in lawsuits involving police brutality and misconduct, shocking officials who said they were unaware of the scope of the problem. Puente's work resulted in a U.S. Justice Department review of the police department, local reforms and proposals for state legislation.
  • The People vs. Brian Tacadena

    At 11:28 p.m. on Sept. 1, 2013, a Santa Barbara Police Department officer shot and killed 46-year-old Brian Tacadena after the officer encountered Tacadena while patrolling Santa Barbara’s Westside. “The People vs. Brian Tacadena” is an in-depth look into the sequence of events that led to the final moments in Tacadena’s life. The story shows how momentum toward tragedy can build slowly over time and then accelerate with fatal consequences over the course of one evening. Besides being a compelling portrait of a troubled man, the story also shows what can happen when mental health illnesses are left largely untreated. The story also examines the cloistered nature of the Santa Barbara Police Department, especially when it comes to reviewing its officer-involved shootings. The story includes a supplementary video featuring the police department’s public information officer discussing the case and how the police department investigates itself, a criminal law attorney specializing in police brutality, and interviews with Tacadena family members and community activists. The story also featured a slideshow of images from Tacadena’s life as well as documents related to his mental-health treatment while incarcerated.
  • New Haven Police Brutality Investigation

    Members of New Haven’s Latino community approached NBC Connecticut with complaints about Officer Dennis O’Connell with the New Haven Police Department. Several people told us that they were being targeted by the officer, and when they encountered him, they were subjected to brutality which included beatings, verbal abuse, and in one case that we found what appeared to be repeated and potentially unnecessary use of a taser. We spoke with several of the alleged victims as a starting point for our story. From there, we embarked on a series of FOI requests that resulted in hundreds of pages of documents ranging from police reports of the alleged incidents to court settlements between the city of New Haven and alleged victims of Officer O’Connell. We spoke to an expert in criminal justice who, after reading through the police reports and reviewing Officer O’Connell’s file, determined there was a definitive and disturbing pattern. He also determined that based on the lack of disciplinary measures and retraining of the officer, NHPD was ignoring a significant problem within their ranks.
  • New Orleans Police

    CBS News takes an in depth look at the allegations of police brutality in the days following Hurricane Katrina. Federal investigators uncovered at least three murders and filed charges against a dozen police officers. The investigation determines why and how the chaos led to the crimes.
  • Off Duty Cops

    For many years, abusive and illegal activity by officers of the Chicago Police Department has gone largely unchecked. This story highlighted two recent cases in which Chicagoans were beaten by off-duty cops, yet the "wall of silence" protected those officers until security camera videos of the events led to a public outcry. The story tried to show that these were not isolated incidents but were actually typical of the culture of the Chicago PD.