Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "police chiefs" ...

  • The Girl Who Got Tied Down

    The Girl Who Got Tied Down is a documentary In two parts about a girl, “Nora”, whit self-destructive behaviour, who got raped by one of Sweden’s most senior police chiefs while she was placed in residential youth care. The documentary reveals several cases of abuse due to the work of the health service and the police in Sweden. It has created uproar and a great deal of anger. In the wake of The Girl Who Got Tied Down the senior psychiatrist charged with caring for “Nora” has been sacked from the hospital where he worked. The private mental health care company which he owns has lost its contract with the County Council.
  • The Girl Who Got Tied Down

    The Girl Who Got Tied Down is a documentary In two parts about a girl, “Nora”, with self-destructive behaviour, who got raped by one of Sweden’s most senior police chiefs while she was placed in residential youth care. The documentary reveals several cases of abuse due to the work of the health service and the police in Sweden. It has created uproar and a great deal of anger. In the wake of The Girl Who Got Tied Down the senior psychiatrist charged with caring for “Nora” has been sacked from the hospital where he worked. The private mental health care company which he owns has lost its contract with the County Council.
  • I-Team: Highway Robbery

    WCPO's investigative unit exposed widespread theft of traffic fines by court clerks in a local community notorious as a speed trap -- Arlington Heights, Ohio. Bigger than the thefts by a pair of court clerks was the government cover up that persisted for at least a decade. We obtained documents showing two successive police chiefs had warned the mayor and fiscal officer of Arlington Heights that a substantial amount of cash was missing as far back as 2002. Rather than heeding those warnings, the elected leaders of Arlington Heights marginalized both police chiefs, who eventually resigned. Our ongoing investigation has directly resulted in: · Multiple felony indictments against two government employees for theft in office. · Passage and subsequent repeal of an illegal ban on television cameras in public council meetings. · The complete and permanent shut-down of the speed trap on I-75 through Arlington Heights, Ohio. · A call from the county prosecutor for the village to be dissolved and annexed into a neighboring city. · Committee passage of Ohio House Bill 523, eliminating mayors' courts in communities with fewer than 1,000 residents. · The adoption of a new public records policy for the Village of Arlington Heights, conforming with Ohio public records and open meetings laws. Chief Investigative Reporter Brendan Keefe successfully fought against a wall of resistance to obtain public documents and gain access to illegally-closed council meetings.
  • "Arpaio Investigation"

    An investigation by KPHO-TV found that Sheriff Joe Arpaio often used his popularity as a means to "retaliate" when claims were made against him. The retaliation was often in the form of "SWAT raids" or "full-blown criminal investigations." Some of his victims included the mayor of Phoenix, Supreme Court judges and local police chiefs. KPHO found the FBI was also investigating the sheriff for "abuse of power."
  • Cop-out

    Texas Monthly reports on the difficulty of finding a new police chief for Austin, after the previous one retired following an internal audit. A lot is expected from police chiefs in the modern world; they must be "politically savvy, financially shrewd, charismatic leaders with a mastery of public relations and an ability to simultaneously reduce crime, instill confidence in minority groups, keep officers' loyalties and navigate dangerous political waters." Police chiefs are often no longer hired after moving up through the ranks, but imported from outside. And according to the Police Executive Research Forum the average tenure for chiefs is only two and a half years.
  • "Eyes on the Street"

    In the late 1960s, the federal government sponsored experiments encouraging police offers nationwide to spend more time int he communities they protected and served. The movement never caught on, but it did capture the interest of several important academics who continued to study and write about "neighborhood team policing," as they called it then. By the mid-1980s, a new generation of college-educated police chiefs had risen to power, and they began turning to what they had learned in college. At the time, crime rates were skyrocketing all over the country, cities were setting annual records for homicides, and politicians neded a new brant of public policy to offer frustrated residents. Tday, community policing is ubiquitous. Like welfare reform, everybody's got to have it, even if no one knows exactly what it is. This article shows how community policing has worked in Chicago.
  • (Untitled)

    This two part investigation examined two cases: an obscure police abuse case in Nashville and a highly publicized one in Milwaukee. In both cases, the police chiefs believed the officers were not only unfit for duty, but also that they posed a danger to the public. Our report showed how civil service commissions which were intended to protect civil servants from politics, also protect bad cops. (June 28, 1996)