Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "police departments" ...

  • Policing in America: Five Years after Ferguson

    CBS News’ “Policing in America: Five Years After Ferguson” is a first-of-its-kind investigation into changes that police departments across America say they're making regarding race and policing since the shooting death of Michael Brown and subsequent protests and unrest in Ferguson, Missouri five years ago.
  • Free to Shoot Again

    In cities from coast to coast, the odds that a shooter will be brought to justice are abysmally low and dropping. Police make an arrest in fewer than half of the murders committed with firearms. If the victim survives being shot, the chance of arrest drops to 1 out of 3. Staffing constraints are so dire at many police departments that thousands of nonfatal shooting cases are never even assigned a detective. The shooters are left free to strike again, fueling cycles of violence and eroding the public’s trust in law enforcement. The Trace, in partnership with BuzzFeed News and later WTTW, published “Free to Shoot Again,” a series of stories that interrogates this failure in policing and the toll that it takes on the people who live in the communities most impacted by gun violence.
  • Free to Shoot Again

    In cities from coast to coast, the odds that a shooter will be brought to justice are abysmally low and dropping. Police make an arrest in fewer than half of the murders committed with firearms. If the victim survives being shot, the chance of arrest drops to 1 out of 3. Staffing constraints are so dire at many police departments that thousands of nonfatal shooting cases are never even assigned a detective. The shooters are left free to strike again, fueling cycles of violence and eroding the public’s trust in law enforcement. The Trace, in partnership with BuzzFeed News and later WTTW, published “Free to Shoot Again,” a series of stories that interrogates this failure in policing and the toll that it takes on the people who live in the communities most impacted by gun violence.
  • NJ.com: The Force Report

    The Force Report is built on five years of data and 72,677 pages of documents. It details every reported incident of police force from 2012 through 2016, at the time the most recent year of data available for the state's 468 local police departments and the State Police. The resulting analysis revealed troubling trends that escaped scrutiny.
  • You, Too - The Public Cost of Sex Harassment

    In a three-month investigation, NBC5 Investigates, Telemundo Chicago, and the Better Government Association tracked down case after case of government employees in the Chicago area, accused of sexual misconduct, harassment, abuse, assault, or even rape. We filed nearly 2,000 public records requests for documents from local governmental agencies, and – so far – found it cost taxpayers $55 million over more than 400 cases. Tracking hundreds of lawsuits, complaints, and internal investigations filed over the past ten years, we found scores of complaints with local police departments, city halls, public schools, community colleges, park districts, townships and more.
  • Forcing the Peace

    WCPO's I-Team investigated police use of force involving officers at 32 local police departments. Our investigation uncovered excessive force, unreported use of force and identified the police officer who punched more people in the face than any other local cop. We also revealed black children were more likely than adults to be tased by police.
  • Watched

    Police forces across the United States are stockpiling massive databases with personal information from millions of Americans who simply crossed paths with officers. A person can end up in one of these databases by doing nothing more than sitting on a public park bench or chatting with an officer on the street. Once there, these records can linger forever and be used by police agencies to track movements, habits, acquaintances and associations – even a person’s marital and job status. What began as a method for linking suspicious behavior to crime had morphed into a practice that threatens to turn local police departments into miniature versions of the NSA. In the process, critics contend, police risk trampling constitutional rights, tarnishing innocent people and further eroding public trust.
  • Justice is not Blind

    Despite Canada’s dropping crime rate, incarceration rates of Indigenous people have been on the rise. Racial profiling and police brutality claims have increased throughout the Prairies but are often dismissed as isolated incidents by police departments. There is very little available data or research to verify whether or not the complaints are symptomatic of a larger systemic issue. Discourse Media and Maclean’s magazine collaborated on a months long investigation looking into whether the experience of Indigenous university students mirrored racial profiling claims in the Prairies, and to better understand student perceptions of police. Discourse Media designed, administered and analyzed a survey that showed that for those surveyed, Indigenous students have greater odds of being stopped by police than non-Indigenous students — and they believe their race is a factor.
  • Walmart. Thousands of police calls. You paid the bill.

    Walmart shifts security burdens to Tampa Bay police departments and the taxpayers that fund them, producing more calls for officers than anywhere else, often for small problems that don’t rise to the level of real crime.
  • Border Patrol Sex Assaults

    CBS News investigation revealed “disturbing” sex abuse within the country’s largest law enforcement agency US Customs and Border Protection. A former top official of the agency told us for the first time that he notified his superiors of a “spike” in sexual misconduct by agents that was significantly higher than any other federal law enforcement agency as well as other large metropolitan police departments. As a result of our story – the DHS integrity council met with our whistleblower and then issued a series of recommended changes to CBP.