Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "prison" ...

  • Guantanamo’s Child – Omar Khadr

    Guantanamo has always been – and remains today – a story told through rhetoric and partisan politics. There is rarely a human face. There is rarely talk of the civil right violations in times of fear. Omar Khadr’s story is a dark chapter in both U.S. and Canadian history, and Guantanamo’s Child shines the light on these abuses for the first time. It is the story of a 15-year-old Canadian who grew up behind bars. It is his first – and only interview, where he talks about his recollections of the firefight, which kept him detained for 12 years. U.S. Special Forces soldiers also give their accounts of the firefight for the first time in exclusive interviews. The testimonies of former interrogators, detainees and military prosecutors reveal what Khadr endured while jailed. https://ajam.boxcn.net/s/zxe5pqfhioxyztdgyh6s4lmhhh08hy56
  • I will die in prison for a nonviolent crime

    Oklahoma's prisons are over capacity, yet more than 50 people are serving life without parole for drugs, the result of an antiquated and ineffective three-strikes law. These inmates are not drug kingpins but regular people who had a drug addiction that landed them behind bars. Three days after the story ran, the governor amended the law to allow more sentencing flexibility in these types of drug cases.
  • Prosecuting Pregnancy

    The criminalization of drug use in pregnancy is universally opposed by health officials and drug policy experts. But the idea that prison is a fitting punishment for prenatal drug use has become widely accepted in Alabama. Starting in 2006, prosecutors began charging women who used drugs during pregnancy with “chemical endangerment,” a form of child abuse that carries a one to 10-year prison sentence if a baby is unharmed and up to 99 years if a baby dies.
  • Guardianship - The Grey Prison

    They're among the most vulnerable members of society. Often elderly, sometimes disabled, those conscripted into guardianship as "wards" are supposed to be protected and safeguarded. But in a first-of-its-kind, in-depth investigation, our team uncovered a system plagued by abuses. Families torn apart. Wards isolated. Estates raided. Judges rubber-stamping wrongdoing and turning a blind eye to the exploitation of private, for-profit guardians. We overcame tremendous resistance from court leaders who tried to dismiss all concerns and put us off this story before we even got started. As we waded through thousands of pages of court documents and other records, we uncovered a system so corrupt that the state was forced to initiate sweeping change. That change started at the Nevada Supreme Court and continues today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P31Zu-wUDWI https://youtu.be/_URbZLLgj6o
  • The Louisiana State Penitentiary Where inmates aren't the only scoundrels

    Burl Cain was America’s most famous jailer. Writers and filmmakers flocked to the remote Louisiana State Penitentiary in West Feliciana Parish to tell the story of how he had cleaned up the most violent jail in America. But there was more to the story. For two decades, Cain profited from his access to powerless inmates and his ability to dispense favors small and large. The Advocate launched an investigation, and after the first story was published, Cain quit his job, hoping that would stop the questions. He was wrong.
  • Preying on Prisoners

    In “Preying on Prisoners,” The Marshall Project exposed how Texas, the state with the most instances of prison sex abuse, fails to penalize prison staffers who sexually abuse inmates. In a six-month investigation, Alysia Santo found that since 2000, the state prison system referred only 400 cases of suspected sexual assault by prison employees for prosecution, of which prosecutors refused to pursue almost half. Ultimately, 126 prison workers were convicted, but just nine were sentenced to jail time, and the rest were subject to fines and a few years probation, with the promise of a clean criminal record if the court’s conditions were met.
  • State Workers' Boss Busted

    The News & Observer reported how Dana Cope, longtime head of the State Employees Association of North Carolina, used the association as his personal piggy bank. He promptly resigned, was indicted, convicted and sentenced to state prison, where he's being watched by the guards whose dues he stole.
  • Youth prison chaos revealed

    A breaking news investigation that revealed a state-federal probe into allegations of abuse and mismanagement at a youth prison facility in northern Wisconsin and quickly identified many of the problems, including poor oversight by the state Department of Corrections.
  • Michael LaForgia

    This report was the first interview with Swiss bank whistleblower Bradley Birkenfeld since the banker had been released from federal prison and awarded $104 million for his role in revealing how thousands of Americans evaded taxes with secret Swiss bank accounts. Birkenfeld had been released years earlier, but had not spoken publicly about his massive new wealth. In our interview, the Boston-born banker gave a tour of his new luxury box at the Boston Garden, showed off his new Porsche, railed against the US Department of Justice, and alleged that unnamed American political figures had secret bank accounts in Switzerland. http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000375411 http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000375414 http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000375403 http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000375407 http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000375435 http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000375431
  • Walking into Danger

    Every other day on average in Chicago, a stranger tries to lure or force a child younger than 16 into a vehicle or building for an illegal purpose. An examination of the 530 most-recent cases revealed legal breakdowns that allowed the vast majority of the predators to avoid prison time or intensive sex offender treatment.